Search found 63 matches

by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Mar 07, 2016 1:38 pm
Forum: *Amines
Topic: Azacrowns
Replies: 1
Views: 640

Re: Azacrowns

no, you don't have to know them
they weren't covered in class
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Mar 07, 2016 1:36 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Boat vs. twist boat conformation
Replies: 1
Views: 564

Re: Boat vs. twist boat conformation

Twist boat is preferred over boat. It's because when twisted, the torsional strain lessens.
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Mar 02, 2016 4:21 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Tert-butyl's Common Name
Replies: 1
Views: 336

Re: Tert-butyl's Common Name

It's because its a substituent. The longest chain that the substituent has is 2 carbons, so ethyl, because the carbon in the substituent is connected to the main chain by that middle carbon, so that carbon has to be in the longest chaing, then you can only get ethane as the longest unbroken chain st...
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Feb 26, 2016 1:40 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Alphebetizing rules in naming Organic Compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 449

Re: Alphebetizing rules in naming Organic Compounds

Basically, prefixes don't count only when your quantifying them. So like di-, tri-. Those kinds of prefixes don't count. But the common name ones like iso or neo do count when alphabetizing.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Feb 23, 2016 8:33 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: How to prioritize hydrocarbon chains of different length?
Replies: 2
Views: 367

Re: How to prioritize hydrocarbon chains of different length

What do you mean by the halogen gets the priority over the double bond. Wouldn't the double bond get priority since it changes the name of the hydrocarbon? And if there is a halogen, isn't it no longer considered a hydrocarbon?
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Feb 17, 2016 10:40 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Pseudo Rate Law
Replies: 2
Views: 1252

Re: Pseudo Rate Law

Pseudo rate laws are important in that they help us figure out the overall rate law when a reaction has more than one reactant and all the concentrations are changing. Since there are so many variables, the pseudo rate law helps simplify the problem and you can focus on one reactant at a time.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Feb 07, 2016 1:55 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: equations
Replies: 2
Views: 461

equations

When asked for a K value, there are 3 equations that you could use: deltaG=-RTlnK E=E(naught)-(RT/nF)lnQ --> 0 = E(naught)-(RT/nF)lnK and E=E(naught) - (0.0592/n)logQ --> 0=E(naught) - (0.0592/n)logK But you get different answers using each of the equations for the same problem. Why? and how do you ...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:18 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Midterm 2013 3A
Replies: 1
Views: 266

Midterm 2013 3A

For the part on work,
I understand how you get w=-PdeltaV=-delta(n)RT
but if there is no change in moles, how does this equation work?
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Feb 06, 2016 5:38 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Midterm 2011 2B
Replies: 2
Views: 532

Midterm 2011 2B

The question states that Container A: 1 mol of ideal monatomic gas Container B: 1 mol of diatomic gas, not vibrationally active Container C: 1 mol of diatomic gas, vibrationally active. The answer states that the containers, in order of increasing change in entropy is B<C<A Why is A the greatest. I ...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Feb 06, 2016 4:32 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: When to use which formula
Replies: 3
Views: 505

Re: When to use which formula

But if you know the initial and final volume, don't you know the change in volume?
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Feb 06, 2016 4:09 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Integrated Rate Law
Replies: 1
Views: 310

Re: Integrated Rate Law

Yes, when Prof Lavelle derived it for us in class, we used the equation
A --> P. Thus a=1
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Feb 03, 2016 4:08 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: E not
Replies: 1
Views: 281

Re: E not

E naught, is the standard reduction potential for each half reaction. The E naught of the entire cell looks at the difference between the two E values of the each half reaction. So, if you multiply both sides by the molar coefficient, the difference between the two values is the same. So, E naught i...
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Jan 29, 2016 10:34 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: O3--> O2
Replies: 2
Views: 740

O3--> O2

how is this a reduction reaction? Aren't the charges on both 0?
The solution manual says to add 2e-, but why? there is not change in charge.
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Jan 27, 2016 11:06 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Isothermal and reversible
Replies: 3
Views: 576

Isothermal and reversible

What exactly does this mean?

Also, in def it says isothermal is deltaT is 0. So wouldn't that make q=0? But in problems, it says that deltaU=0. Why?
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Jan 25, 2016 12:36 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Residual
Replies: 2
Views: 423

Residual

What exactly is residual entropy, and why does the book say the equation S=kBlnW is statistical entropy?
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Jan 25, 2016 12:32 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Residual Entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 545

Re: Residual Entropy

It is not always ln2
In more general terms, it is lnA^N where A is the number of positions there are, and N are the number of particles available to fill a position.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Jan 24, 2016 5:13 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: equations
Replies: 1
Views: 276

equations

In my discussion, we went through examples that used w= p(deltaV) and then w=integral from V2->V1(PdV) when do we use which one?
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Jan 20, 2016 8:03 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Calculating W
Replies: 2
Views: 373

Re: Calculating W

I think we are assuming that each state has equal energy. I don't think you have to worry about them reacting with each other. For the sake of the example, I think we just assume that they don't.
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Jan 20, 2016 7:59 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Reversible and irreversible
Replies: 1
Views: 344

Re: Reversible and irreversible

Well, a reversible process means that it can be undone without any change in the thermodynamic state. It is a very slow process in which all heat would be transferred to work, but this is an ideal process. It doesn't happen real life. A irreversible process is the opposite. It is a faster process th...
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Jan 20, 2016 7:51 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Monoatomic and Diatomic
Replies: 2
Views: 481

Re: Monoatomic and Diatomic

I may be wrong, but you have to assume that the gas will act like an ideal gas, or they will tell you that it does. From there, if you know the molecule, you should know if it is monatomic or diatomic, like He is monatomic, but O2 is diatomic.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Jan 12, 2016 5:43 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Equation W=delta U-q in problem 8.7
Replies: 1
Views: 361

Re: Equation W=delta U-q in problem 8.7

You basically just rearrange the equation delta U= w + q

To use it, you plug and chug.
In context of this question, delta U = 982 J
q= 492 J
so w= 982-492J = 490J
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:44 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy of Reaction
Replies: 1
Views: 246

Enthalpy of Reaction

How do you estimate the enthalpy of formation in problem 8.67?
The answer key says that H(f,water(l))=deltaH(f,water(gas)) - deltaH(vap)
but I don't understand where they got that from and how the bond breakdown works.
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:32 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Sublimation
Replies: 2
Views: 301

Re: Sublimation

Well, sublimation is when a solid changes directly into a gas. It skips the liquid stage. You can see why this happens when you look at a phase diagram http://d32ogoqmya1dw8.cloudfront.net/images/research_education/equilibria/h2o_phase_diagram_-_color.v2.jpg"onclick="window.open(this.href);return fa...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Jan 10, 2016 10:28 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Enthalpy density
Replies: 1
Views: 247

Enthalpy density

Why is the answer to 8.51, the enthalpy density positive 239000 and not negative? If energy is released, isn't that supposed to be a negative value?
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Jan 10, 2016 4:49 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating Curve
Replies: 1
Views: 383

Heating Curve

For 8.41, it says The following data were collected for a new compound used in cosmetics: !Hfus" 10.0 kJ·mol$1, !Hvap" 20.0kJ·mol1; heat capacities: 30 J·mol$1 for the solid; 60 J·mol$1 for the liquid; 30 J·mol$1 for the gas. Which heating curve below best matches the data for this compoun...
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Jan 06, 2016 3:15 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Steam v Water
Replies: 4
Views: 670

Re: Steam v Water

It's because steam can get to a higher temperature than liquid water can. Liquid water can only get to 100C before it starts vaporizing, while steam can get even hotter.
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Dec 04, 2015 8:15 pm
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Henderson-Hasselbalch
Replies: 1
Views: 399

Henderson-Hasselbalch

Is there anyway to know when to use Henderson-Hasselbalch and when to use ICE box, or are they always interchangeable?
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Dec 01, 2015 9:33 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: finding pH
Replies: 2
Views: 545

finding pH

In class, Professor Lavelle said that we use only Ka1 to determine pH for polyprotic acids and bases. With the exception of H2SO4 where we use Ka2 too. But then in some of the textbook problems they either give you Ka2 or expect you to find it. How do you know when to use Ka2 in determining pH and h...
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Dec 01, 2015 4:36 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Determining if a compound is a salt
Replies: 1
Views: 328

Re: Determining if a compound is a salt

A salt is an ionic compound composed of an anion and a cation. Under acids and bases, it is formed during a neutralization reaction. Since it is compound composed of balanced charges of anions and cations, salt have no net charge.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:57 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: HF Acid
Replies: 3
Views: 560

Re: HF Acid

It is because HF has such a strong bond that it does not dissociate very easily. A strong acid is one that dissociates completely. So HF is not a strong acid.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:51 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining pH
Replies: 3
Views: 702

Re: Determining pH

so what you have to do is find the concentration of H3O+ by using the ICE box. Once you find the concentration, you use the pH=-log[H3O+] and once you find the pH, you can order them.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:49 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Relative base strength.
Replies: 1
Views: 377

Relative base strength.

Looking at problem 12.49, how can you tell if BrO- is stronger or C17H19O3N is a stronger base? Is it based off it's size or do you need to the the Ka value? Is there an easy way to look and know?
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:47 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: HF, HCl, HBr, and HI Acid Strength
Replies: 1
Views: 4197

Re: HF, HCl, HBr, and HI Acid Strength

It's because HF has the strongest bond that it makes it the weakest out of all of them. The stronger the acids, the more easily it dissociates in solution. Since HF has the strongest bond, it doesn't dissociate as easily as HI does, making it weaker.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Nov 22, 2015 1:19 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining Acids and Bases
Replies: 5
Views: 737

Re: Determining Acids and Bases

There is no way to tell through structure or anything like that. You simply have to know which ones are strong and the rest are weak.
Common strong acids are HCl, H2SO4, HBr, HI, HClO4, HNO3, HClO3.
Common strong bases are column one hydroxides and column two hydroxides starting with Ca.
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Nov 20, 2015 1:44 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Proton Transfer Equilibria and Conjugate acid-base pairs
Replies: 1
Views: 1612

Re: Proton Transfer Equilibria and Conjugate acid-base pairs

H2SO4 +H2O <--> H3O + HSO4
acid: H2SO4
CB: HSO4

Since it is polyprotic
HSO4 + H2O <--> H3) +SO4
acid: HSO4
CB: SO4

The overall reaction would be
H2SO4 + 2H20 <--> 2H3O + SO4
acid: H2SO4
CB: SO4
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:25 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Complex
Replies: 2
Views: 498

Re: Chelating Complex

A coordination complex will form a chelating complex if the ligands have a lone pair that can form a bond, and if the two ligands are close enough together to form one. i.e. two NH2 attached on opposite sides of a benzene ring will not form a chelating complex even though they have the lone pair, si...
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:19 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Shape of Coordination Compound
Replies: 1
Views: 360

Re: Shape of Coordination Compound

You have to use Crystal Field Theory, which we did not learn in class, nor are we responsible for knowing. but if you are really interested, this does a pretty good job of explaining it http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Crystal_Field_Theory/Crystal_Field_Theory"onclick="window.open(thi...
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: How do you determine if an element is an Acid or Base?
Replies: 2
Views: 560

Re: How do you determine if an element is an Acid or Base?

Also, since certain compounds are amphoteric, you have to see how they react with other compounds in order to determine that as well.
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:13 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acids and Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 342

Re: Strong Acids and Bases

In other words, it is simply 10^-pH
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:09 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Total Pressure of a System
Replies: 1
Views: 399

Re: Total Pressure of a System

You just add the partial pressures together. The partial pressure already takes the mole fraction into account, in the sense that the partial pressure of a gas is the total pressure times the mole fraction.
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:06 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Aqueous Solutions in Equilibrium Constant Calculations
Replies: 1
Views: 291

Re: Aqueous Solutions in Equilibrium Constant Calculations

Yes. The only ones you wouldn't include are solids and liquids. Aqueous solutions and gases are included in the equation.
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:04 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Effect of inert gasses on equilibrium
Replies: 1
Views: 390

Re: Effect of inert gasses on equilibrium

It is because it is not the pressure that causes the shift, it is the concentration of the gases. When you add the inert gas, it doesn't react with any of the gases in the container, so the concentration of the gases involved in the reaction stays the same so there is no shift. When you adjust the p...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 31, 2015 5:50 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: heteronuclear diatomic molecules
Replies: 1
Views: 224

heteronuclear diatomic molecules

When it comes to the diatomic molecules when one atom is Z<8 and the other is Z>8, how do you draw the energy diagram. The bonding sigma is above the bonding pi right, just like in the diagram when Z<8. If that's true, how do we draw the VSEPR one on the sides. I know one is lower in energy than the...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 31, 2015 5:45 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Molecular Orbital Theory Order
Replies: 1
Views: 192

Re: Molecular Orbital Theory Order

When the atomic number is less than 8, the bonding sigma is above the bonding pi, and when it is 8 and above, the bonding sigma is below the bonding pi.
At least for homonuclear diatomic molecules.
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Oct 30, 2015 3:33 pm
Forum: NEWS & RESOURCES
Topic: MO Diagrams for Heteronuclear Molecules
Replies: 2
Views: 1891

Re: MO Diagrams for Heteronuclear Molecules

Can you explain the concept here in case you cannot make it to the review today, or this weekend?
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Oct 30, 2015 3:29 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: electronegativity and energy diagrams
Replies: 1
Views: 352

electronegativity and energy diagrams

In the hw, its 4.57 (c). I was wondering how the molecular energy diagram might tell you in the molecular orbitals, wether the electrons will have a higher probability of being at N or at O in the NO+ molecule. Does this have to do with the electronegativity of the molecule? or do you get this from ...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:15 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of XeF4
Replies: 1
Views: 1219

Re: Hybridization of XeF4

If you draw out the lewis structure for it, you find that the molecule has 6 areas of electron density. So, it has a hybridization of sp3d2. Unlike shape, the hybridization relies upon the number of areas of electron density, not on the number of atoms it is bonded to.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:13 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Quiz 2
Replies: 2
Views: 391

Quiz 2

Will we have to know bond order, molecular orbitals, paramagnetic/diamagnetic, for quiz 2? We didn't go over them in class but they are in the practice tests.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Shapes and Lone Pair Electrons on central atom
Replies: 1
Views: 221

Re: VSEPR Shapes and Lone Pair Electrons on central atom

If you have a linear structure with lone pairs, it simply means that the repulsion of the lone pairs act equally on the other two molecules so that they aren't pushed past the 180 bond angle. For example, If you had a molecule of AX2E3, it would still be considered linear. (It is trigonal bipyramida...
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:08 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Strengths of Repulsions
Replies: 3
Views: 449

Re: Strengths of Repulsions

Atom is another way of saying bonded. The electrons are bonded to another atom, instead of being a free lone pair.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:55 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: polarizability
Replies: 2
Views: 527

Re: polarizability

Basically, the bigger the atom, the more polarizable it is, and the smaller the atom (typically cations), the more polarizing power it has. This is because the smaller the atom, the stronger the pull from the nucleus is. Also, it has less electrons to shield the pull. With polarizability, the bigger...
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Oct 13, 2015 7:03 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity vs Ionization Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 610

Re: Electron Affinity vs Ionization Energy

Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from an atom while electron affinity is how easily an atom will accept an electron into its shells.
by Julia Kim 1D
Tue Oct 13, 2015 7:01 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Absorbing vs Emitting energy
Replies: 2
Views: 350

Re: Absorbing vs Emitting energy

Also, an electron can both emit and absorb energy creating its respective spectrums. So when it absorbs energy, like ChemMod said, it shows up as dark lines on a colorful spectrum, while when the electron emits energy, it shows up as a colored line on a black spectrum.
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 10, 2015 4:52 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Chapter 2 question 85
Replies: 1
Views: 314

Re: Chapter 2 question 85

Well, you know that as n, or your principle quantum number, increases, the space between the levels becomes smaller and smaller. So, with the bigger atoms, where n is large, the space between the energy levels is so small, that small changes can cause the electrons to jump around and change the norm...
by Julia Kim 1D
Sat Oct 10, 2015 4:50 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Beginning the F orbital for electron configurations
Replies: 2
Views: 376

Re: Beginning the F orbital for electron configurations

The f block starts in row 6, after Barium, and starts with the 4f orbital in the Lanthanoids.
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Oct 07, 2015 3:17 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Infrared Spectroscopy
Replies: 1
Views: 390

Infrared Spectroscopy

This is for hw problem number 55 for chapter 1. How do I go about finding the frequency if given the reciprocal centimeters? What exactly are the reciprocal centimeters? Is it frequency divided by speed of light?. If so, do I have to change the cm to m?
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Oct 05, 2015 2:14 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Degenerate Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 388

Re: Degenerate Orbitals

I don't think that degeneracy really occurs. I think it more just is. If you have a one electron ion or a Hydrogen atom, the orbitals are degenerate.
by Julia Kim 1D
Mon Oct 05, 2015 1:55 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Homework 2.37b the nature of shielding in different orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 842

Re: Homework 2.37b the nature of shielding in different orbi

For shielding, it is not that the electrons closer to the nucleus necessarily block the pull. It is that the farther out the electron is, the more electron electron repulsion there is, which acts to counter the pull of the positively charged nucleus. S orbitals are better at shielding because the el...
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:51 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Psi in the Born interpretation of the wave function
Replies: 1
Views: 394

Re: Psi in the Born interpretation of the wave function

Psi is just the height of the wave at a said position, in other words, the amplitude. But it has no physical significance the way psi^2 does. I think the graphs were there just to show you the comparison and to act as a visual to explain that we use the sin or cos function.
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:49 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg delta p and delta x
Replies: 3
Views: 800

Re: Heisenberg delta p and delta x

I'm pretty sure that you would put 8. If you look at the example from the lecture about the atom diameter, you are using the entire range, not just the +/- of it, if that makes any sense. In other words, if you assume that the center of the atom is zero, then it would be +/-8.5x10^-16, but we used t...
by Julia Kim 1D
Wed Sep 30, 2015 4:13 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Information not taught
Replies: 1
Views: 529

Information not taught

I noticed while doing the homework that some of the problems deal with topics that were not taught, such as specifics about black body radiation, and Z dependent Rydberg relationship. Are we required to know these for tests? Will we go over it in class?
by Julia Kim 1D
Fri Sep 25, 2015 4:46 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Homework
Replies: 5
Views: 734

Homework

Do we have to read the entire chapter assigned for homework on top of the problems? I started reading Chapter 1 but it seems to cover a lot more information than I think we will cover in class. Do we have to read all 54 pages or just do the practice problems?

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