Search found 20 matches

by Caroline Chen 2A
Fri Mar 11, 2016 2:42 pm
Forum: *Electrophilic Addition
Topic: Intermediates in electrophilic addition
Replies: 1
Views: 294

Re: Intermediates in electrophilic addition

Um the answer in the workbook should be 2. There is one intermediate step, but two intermediates; they're different things. There are two intermediates in the reaction and both are then used up to make the product.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Tue Mar 01, 2016 11:14 pm
Forum: *Nucleophilic Substitution
Topic: Difference between SN2 Reaction and Electrophilic Addition
Replies: 1
Views: 692

Re: Difference between SN2 Reaction and Electrophilic Additi

For an addition reaction, you take two things and make one. For a substitution reaction, you take two things and end with two things.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Fri Feb 26, 2016 4:18 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Cis- versus Trans-
Replies: 1
Views: 252

Re: Cis- versus Trans-

I don't think we need to indicate cis- or trans- unless asked to.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Wed Feb 17, 2016 9:27 am
Forum: *Enzyme Kinetics
Topic: Catalyst vs. Enzyme
Replies: 2
Views: 851

Re: Catalyst vs. Enzyme

Catalysts can increase or decrease the rate of the reaction, and are inorganic molecules, while enzymes are proteins that increase the rate of a reaction.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Thu Feb 11, 2016 4:04 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Half Life Question
Replies: 1
Views: 372

Re: Half Life Question

Half life is the amount of time it takes to decrease a substance amount to half of its original concentration. Different conditions do not affect the half life.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Wed Feb 03, 2016 9:44 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing Basic Redox Reactions (HW 14.5 A)
Replies: 2
Views: 386

Re: Balancing Basic Redox Reactions (HW 14.5 A)

For 14.5 A, you would know to split up the redox reactions into O3->O2 and Br->BrO3 because O3 in the first half reaction loses an O, and then O3 is added to Br in the second half reaction (don't forget to balance the reactions). In 14.3 D, Cl2 was used in both half reactions because Cl2 was the onl...
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sat Jan 23, 2016 12:00 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs Free Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 304

Re: Gibbs Free Energy

Gibbs free energy combines the state functions of enthalpy and entropy to find the maximum amount of work you can get from some amount of substance in a given state. You can also use it to find out whether a specific reaction is favored or not. I don't have an example for Gibbs free energy, but ther...
by Caroline Chen 2A
Thu Jan 14, 2016 9:39 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Closed System
Replies: 2
Views: 490

Re: Closed System

By definition, an adiabatic system is a system in which no heat enters or leaves, so q=0.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Wed Jan 06, 2016 10:01 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Explaining kJ/mol
Replies: 3
Views: 517

Explaining kJ/mol

Can someone explain what Dr. Lavelle went over at the end of today's lecture (01/06)? He mentioned something about kilojoules per mole, rather than using just kilojoules or joules, and I didn't really understand what was said. Thank you!
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sun Dec 06, 2015 1:13 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate Base Stability
Replies: 2
Views: 2181

Conjugate Base Stability

What does it mean to say that a conjugate base is stabilized by resonance?
by Caroline Chen 2A
Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:51 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: SO2
Replies: 2
Views: 495

Re: SO2

SO2 is a nonmetal oxide, which means it's a Lewis acid. This is because the central atom in SO2 has lone pairs, and these can interact with lone pairs on other atoms or molecules so that another bond forms on the central atom, thus making SO2 a Lewis acid because it's accepting the electron pair fro...
by Caroline Chen 2A
Mon Nov 16, 2015 6:38 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Transition Metal Oxidation States
Replies: 1
Views: 342

Transition Metal Oxidation States

How do we find the oxidation state of a transition metal, and how important is it to naming coordination compounds?
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:53 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium constant
Replies: 2
Views: 287

Re: Equilibrium constant

We do not include solids and liquids when calculating equilibrium constant using partial pressures; only gases are used in the calculation.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sat Nov 07, 2015 3:56 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Formula for sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(III)
Replies: 2
Views: 450

Re: Formula for sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(III)

I don't think there's a rule that addresses where the H2O molecule is in a coordination compound formula. I was told that more often than not, the H2O molecule is written after the other ligands, but it doesn't really matter which way it's written since they're all attached to the central atom.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Tue Oct 27, 2015 10:40 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Highest Energy Electron in Vanadium
Replies: 1
Views: 1238

Re: Highest Energy Electron in Vanadium

The actual explanation as to why the 4s orbital is higher in energy than 3d even though 4s is filled first is very complicated, but I think the easiest way to think about this is that because 4s (n=4) means its electrons are in the orbital farther away from the atom nucleus than 3d (n=3), so it's at...
by Caroline Chen 2A
Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:39 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Expanded Octet
Replies: 9
Views: 1320

Re: Expanded Octet

104422816 wrote:Also, is it only Hydrogen and Helium that can have less than an octet?


I don't know how to answer Joanna's question, but I believe lithium, beryllium, and boron also have less than an octet even when bonded with other atoms.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sat Oct 24, 2015 1:32 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Expanded Octet
Replies: 9
Views: 1320

Re: Expanded Octet

I still don't understand. Why don't they need to occupy these orbitals given the number of electrons they have?
by Caroline Chen 2A
Tue Oct 13, 2015 11:55 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Fall 2013 Quiz Preperation Problem 10
Replies: 4
Views: 548

Re: Fall 2013 Quiz Preperation Problem 10

Generally when doing problems, you should plug in whole values or at least values rounded past the number of sig figs given, so that at the end you have a more accurate answer without roundoff error. Then, round your answer according to the sig figs of the problem at the end. For the slight differen...
by Caroline Chen 2A
Fri Oct 09, 2015 5:01 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Removing Electrons
Replies: 1
Views: 246

Re: Removing Electrons

Although 4s is filled up before 3d, as soon as 3d has an electron in it, it has lower energy than 4s. Since 3d is closer to the nucleus than 4s is, then an electron from 4s would be easier to remove than from 3d.
by Caroline Chen 2A
Sat Oct 03, 2015 8:25 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Rounding with Sig Figs
Replies: 3
Views: 449

Re: Rounding with Sig Figs

When I round with sig figs and the last digit is 5, how do I round? I'm confused because sometimes the answer will be rounded down, but sometimes it will be rounded up. How do I know when I should round up or down?

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