Search found 20 matches

by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Fri Mar 11, 2016 1:54 am
Forum: *Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes (Staggered, Eclipsed, Gauche, Anti, Newman Projections)
Topic: 1-chloropropane Newman Projection
Replies: 1
Views: 3495

1-chloropropane Newman Projection

For the Newman projection when looking at C1-C2 bond for 1-choloropropane why is that for carbon one it is cl, h, h instead of cl,h,ch3?
Also when drawing Newman projections how can one tell where to place your chlorines or methyls for the most stable conformation?
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Feb 29, 2016 2:59 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Intermediates
Replies: 1
Views: 386

Intermediates

For an electrophillic addition reaction, are there 2 intermediate molecules or 1 intermediate step? Or is both true?
In the workbook quiz 3, number 5, they ask for how many intermediates there are, but is it asking for each step or specifically molecules?
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Sat Feb 27, 2016 4:19 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Transition States
Replies: 1
Views: 389

Transition States

When drawing electrophilic addition and electrophilic aromatic substitutions reactions do I always include the transitions states? or do I only include the transition states for when drawing substitution reactions?
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Thu Feb 18, 2016 9:39 pm
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: Activation Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 423

Re: Activation Energy

Activation Energy is the energy needed to start a reaction. If there is smaller activation energy, the reaction is proceeding faster and is more favorable. If there is a bigger activation energy, the reaction is slower, kinetically more stable, and thermodynamically unstable.
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Tue Feb 09, 2016 8:31 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Heat of Surroundings
Replies: 1
Views: 330

Heat of Surroundings

What are some key words that I should look for in order to know when to use the heating curve or when I would use heat of the system=negative heat of the surroundings, and also for when I would add different heats?
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Wed Feb 03, 2016 9:20 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Voltaic Cell with Standard Hydrogen Electrode
Replies: 1
Views: 290

Voltaic Cell with Standard Hydrogen Electrode

If there were two voltaic cells, each with a standard hydrogen electrode in one compartment, one being Pb/Pb2+ and the other Cu/Cu2+ how do you know which is the anode for each cell. I know in the book they give an example of H and Cu and the anode is H but I do not really understand why?
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:09 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Entropy using enthalpy (9.15)
Replies: 1
Views: 376

Entropy using enthalpy (9.15)

Hi, for question 15 part A of chapter 9, the question asks for the entropy change for the freezing of water at zero celsius, and I know that the equation I would have to use is the changeinS=q rev /T. I also know that I would have to substitute q for H because water is going through a phase change, ...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Fri Jan 22, 2016 12:02 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible and Irreversible Reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 401

Re: Reversible and Irreversible Reactions

If the question has the key word, irreversible and isothermal and it is asking for work, you would use w=-nRTln(V1/V2).
If the question has the word, fixed expansion, and it is asking to find work, you would use w=-P(external)timesthechangeinvolume.
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Thu Jan 14, 2016 9:35 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating Curve
Replies: 3
Views: 634

Heating Curve

Hi all, I need help with understanding the differences between the graphs of #43 ch.8 I get that the change in enthalpy for fusion is smaller then the change in enthalpy for vaporization because the enthalpy change is smaller, so the rate is faster so the line is shorter, but how do I do I know the ...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:23 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Reversible Expansion
Replies: 1
Views: 423

Re: Reversible Expansion

Gas can do the most work in a reversible expansion because at any point during the expansion, even the slightest increase in external pressure would cause, in the book's example, a piston to move in more (pushed inside rather than pushed out). This means that this is the maximum work a gas can do be...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Tue Dec 01, 2015 1:13 am
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Calculating pH and using Kw
Replies: 1
Views: 2078

Re: Calculating pH and using Kw

You would divide Kw by Kb when you are solving for Ka. For this problem, since this salt does not have any effect on the pH, we do not have to put it in our equation. Therefore, you are left with the weak base, NH 2 NH 2 and when you have a weak base reacting with water you result in a hydroxide ion...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Nov 23, 2015 12:31 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining Strength of an Acid/Base
Replies: 2
Views: 771

Re: Determining Strength of an Acid/Base

When an acid is strong, the pH value is small, and the Ka is a big number. However when you have a strong base, the Kb value is a big number because (Ka)x(Kb)=Kw is an inverse relationship. so if Ka is a strong acid, then the value of Kb is big. Also strong bases have a higher pH value. Also in the ...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Nov 16, 2015 9:07 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE Table-Change in Concentration
Replies: 2
Views: 862

ICE Table-Change in Concentration

Hi, I have a question regarding the x part in the ICE table. In the course reader, there are examples of the change in concentration part, in which the the x for the reactants were usually subtracted by the initial molar concentration, while the x for the products were added and I was wondering why ...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:55 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Finding the value of equilibrium constant
Replies: 1
Views: 307

Finding the value of equilibrium constant

Hello. I have a question regarding the homework problem 11.37. I do not know how to find the equilibrium constant when they do not give the concentrations of the reactants and the products. They only give you the value of K at 400. K which is 41, so for example the equation the textbook gives is 2 N...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Nov 02, 2015 11:12 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Homework Problem 4.63a
Replies: 2
Views: 486

Re: Homework Problem 4.63a

It is because of Hund's rule that B^2 is paramagnetic. I am pretty sure both electron configurations are correct.
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Thu Oct 29, 2015 9:56 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Bond order for H2+ and He2 concerning bond length
Replies: 1
Views: 7645

Re: Bond order for H2+ and He2 concerning bond length

I would say yes because, from what I have noticed, the bigger the bond order, the shorter and stronger the bond is. Also the bond order determines the stability of the bond, so since H 2 ^+ has a bond order of 1/2, it will be stronger bond than He^2 because He^2 has a bond length of 0 and a bond len...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Mon Oct 19, 2015 6:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw and Triganol Bipyramid
Replies: 4
Views: 2172

Seesaw and Triganol Bipyramid

Hello. In lecture today, I did not clearly understand the difference between seesaw shape and triganol bipyramid shape. For example SF 4 , is it seesaw shape because of the one lone pair on sulfur? Could I just tell the difference by saying that a triagonal bipyramid shape has 5 regions of electron ...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Wed Oct 14, 2015 1:59 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Chapter2 #67B Electron Affinity
Replies: 1
Views: 340

Chapter2 #67B Electron Affinity

Hello. May someone clarify why carbon has a higher electron affinity than nitrogen. At first I thought it was nitrogen because in the course reader it says that there is a high electron affinity for elements in top right, and nitrogen is closer to the top right, but the answer is carbon.
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:32 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Chapter 2, Question 19 Part B
Replies: 1
Views: 302

Re: Chapter 2, Question 19 Part B

Hello, I believe the answer would be ml=5 because the question gives you a 6d subshell, which means it is in the d-oribital. If it is in the d-orbital, we know that l=2, so to get ml, you would start off with l and then subtract 1 from l.( ml=l, l-1,...-l ). Therefore ml= 2,1,0,-1,-2, which is 5 val...
by Macy Matsukawa 3J
Wed Sep 30, 2015 9:37 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: L29
Replies: 1
Views: 390

L29

Hello. I am struggling to find the empirical formula of the oxide for this problem and the name of the oxide. A 1.50-g sample of metallic tin was placed in a 26.45-g crucible and heated until all the tin had reacted with the oxygen in air to form an oxide. The crucible and product together were foun...

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