Search found 15 matches

by sneman
Sun Mar 13, 2016 8:18 pm
Forum: *Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes (Staggered, Eclipsed, Gauche, Anti, Newman Projections)
Topic: Newman Projections Given a Specific Carbon Bond
Replies: 1
Views: 309

Newman Projections Given a Specific Carbon Bond

If you are asked to draw the most stable Newman Projection of a molecule from, for example, C2-C3 (from left to right), does this mean that the groups on the left of C2 are those on the front of the Newman projections (not behind the circle)? In other words, is the Newman Projection from C3-C2 any d...
by sneman
Tue Mar 01, 2016 7:28 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Effect of Temperature on Reaction Profile
Replies: 1
Views: 257

Effect of Temperature on Reaction Profile

Given a reaction profile of any reaction with the y axis corresponding to delta G, would a change in temperature have any effect on the appearance of the reaction profile? I know that increasing the temperature increases the rate of reaction by increasing the rate constant (k), but doesn't this just...
by sneman
Wed Feb 24, 2016 2:00 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: How to Identify Equivalent Hydrogens
Replies: 1
Views: 285

How to Identify Equivalent Hydrogens

In class, we went over the example of CH3-CH2-CH3 and established which hydrogens would be considered to be "equivalent", or, in the same chemical environment. What does it mean to be in the same chemical environment?
by sneman
Sun Feb 21, 2016 9:51 am
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Determining where to combine reactants
Replies: 1
Views: 346

Re: Determining where to combine reactants

I can explain this using the reaction mechanism on page 87 in the course reader with 2-butene. Looking at HBr, the hydrogen has a slightly positive charge whereas the bromine is slightly negative. Next, looking at 2-butene, the pi-bond in the double-bond is a region of electron density so we would c...
by sneman
Sun Feb 14, 2016 12:52 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Limiting reactants in relation to kinetics
Replies: 1
Views: 349

Limiting reactants in relation to kinetics

Does the limiting reactant of a reaction have any effect on the rate of the reaction, or does it simply tell you about the amount of product that is formed?
by sneman
Fri Feb 05, 2016 1:15 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: When "-q surroundings" includes Calorimeter
Replies: 1
Views: 360

When "-q surroundings" includes Calorimeter

When given a reaction inside of a bomb calorimeter and determining the enthalpy change in the surroundings, how do you know when to include the calorimeter in the surroundings and when to just establish the surroundings as the solution within the calorimeter?
by sneman
Sat Jan 30, 2016 10:38 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Residual Entropy of Bromobenzene
Replies: 2
Views: 582

Re: Residual Entropy of Bromobenzene

Do diatomic molecules such as hydrogen gas or molecules such as carbon dioxide have residual entropy? In other words, is switching the positions of the carbons attached to the oxygen or the positions of the two hydrogens in hydrogen gas considered to be a different "arrangement"?
by sneman
Thu Jan 21, 2016 10:11 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 291

Balancing Chemical Reactions

In this chapter, rather than using whole number coefficients, we have been using a lot of fractions. I was wondering if there is a general step-by-step process of balancing equations this way. Sometimes I do not know which compound receives the fraction coefficient and which compounds have whole num...
by sneman
Thu Jan 21, 2016 10:02 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.53- Calculating the change in internal energy
Replies: 3
Views: 377

Re: 8.53- Calculating the change in internal energy

You have the right formula for the change in internal energy. Whenever you are given a bomb calorimeter, however, this implies that the volume is fixed. In order for work to be done, there must be a change in volume. Therefor, no work is done and w=0.
by sneman
Fri Jan 15, 2016 11:20 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.53- Calculating the change in internal energy
Replies: 3
Views: 377

8.53- Calculating the change in internal energy

8.53 gives a chemical reaction, total heat capacity, and the change in temperature for the reaction. Part b) of this problem asks you to find the change in internal energy for 1.40 g of a reactant after calculating the change in internal energy for 1 mole. In the solutions manual, they convert from ...
by sneman
Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:00 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Temperature V. Thermal Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 273

Temperature V. Thermal Energy

What is the difference between temperature and thermal energy?
by sneman
Fri Nov 27, 2015 8:17 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: (VIDEO)-Determining the Emperical Formula from Two Reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 526

Re: (VIDEO)-Determining the Emperical Formula from Two React

This is our video on determining empirical formulas, focusing on Problem 1D from the 2006 Final.

Sophia Neman -1A- 604 630 587
by sneman
Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:49 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Applied Wavefunction
Replies: 1
Views: 325

Applied Wavefunction

I understand that a wave-function squared gives the probability of finding an electron in an atom, but what exactly do the different points on the wave itself convey? For example, if I were to look at the area between the nucleus and n=1, what would the peak of the wave-function be and what would th...
by sneman
Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:44 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: degenerate levels
Replies: 1
Views: 353

Re: degenerate levels

To be degenerate means to have the same amount of energy. For one electron atoms, all orbitals of the same principal quantum number will have the same amount of energy. This means that in Hydrogen, for example, a 4s orbital and a 4p orbital are degenerate, or, have the same amount of energy. However...
by sneman
Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:55 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: How to use wavelength to calculate KE
Replies: 1
Views: 2779

How to use wavelength to calculate KE

This is a question from the online module: A metal must absorb radiation w/minimum frequency of 1.09 x10^15 s^-1 before it can emit an electron from its surface. Part A asks, "what is the minimum energy needed to produce this effect". I calculated the threshold energy and got 7.22 x 10^-19...

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