Search found 13 matches

by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:24 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Most Stable Conformation - Larger Substituent
Replies: 2
Views: 348

Re: Most Stable Conformation - Larger Substituent

It would be the largest substituent by looking at the mass, so you would want to put an ethyl in the equatorial to prioritize size over Br.
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:21 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Chair Comformation Orientation
Replies: 2
Views: 487

Re: Chair Comformation Orientation

The orientation of the chair doesn't matter, whether it's leaning more left or more right, as long as when you do the chair flip you make sure two have two chairs that are opposite each other.
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Fri Mar 04, 2016 5:44 pm
Forum: *Identifying Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Quaternary Carbons, Hydrogens, Nitrogens
Topic: Trans and Cis
Replies: 2
Views: 376

Re: Trans and Cis

Yeah you can see if it's trans or cis by looking at both the line structure or the lewis structure, it's just not as easily noticeable in a line structure as it is in a lewis structure. In the line structure, you look at the attachments to the carbon at either side of the double bond, and you keep g...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sat Feb 27, 2016 11:39 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Source of electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 238

Re: Source of electrons

Most of the time if the electrons are coming from a bond it is from a double bond that is breaking or a single bond that is breaking and is giving it's electrons to to fill another atom, like H-O breaking and Hydrogen giving the two electrons from the bond to fill Oxygen's octet. The source of elect...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Feb 21, 2016 1:52 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: AlCl3
Replies: 3
Views: 979

Re: AlCl3

AlCl3 acts as an electrophile because when you draw out the lewis structure, it has no lone pairs or lone electrons left over, they are all taken up by the Cl. Therefore, the compound AlCl3 is an electrophile because it is positive and electron deficient or electron loving, meaning it's missing any ...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Feb 14, 2016 10:43 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Rate law for 1st order reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 324

Rate law for 1st order reaction

For the rate of a 1st order reaction, the slope of the reaction is -K, which satisfies the integrated equation, but the rate constants can only be positive values, so how does that work out?
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:30 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Identifying half reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 319

Identifying half reactions

When given a reaction that has only one reactant and two or more products, such as A=B+C , and asked to balance the redox reaction, how to you identify the half reactions with only one reactant? Do you do A=B as one and A=C as the other, or do you see A=B+C all as one half reaction?
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sat Jan 30, 2016 12:48 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Voltage changing while balancing equations?
Replies: 2
Views: 489

Re: Voltage changing while balancing equations?

The voltage difference between two standard electrodes is always the same because E is an extensive property aka E stays the same when the reaction is balanced. The only time E changes is when you change the direction of the reaction, in that case the sign of E changes from positive to negative or v...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Jan 24, 2016 10:17 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Reversible Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 271

Reversible Reactions

When calculating for a reversible work reaction, we derive w=-\Delta nRT, w=-nRTln\frac{V2}{V1}, and w=-nRTln\frac{P1}{P2} from w=-P\Delta V . Is it possible to use either of these equations to solve for work since they are all related? Or is it just specifically used for volume changes and pressure...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:43 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: enthalpy/entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 315

Re: enthalpy/entropy

Enthalpy is the amount of heat released /absorbed at a constant pressure ( q=\Delta H ). Other important points under enthalpy are that q=mC\Delta T , that if a reaction gives off heat it is called exothermic, and if a reaction absorbs heat it is called endothermic. Entropy is the disorder/chaos of...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:32 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: The Universe
Replies: 2
Views: 396

Re: The Universe

The energy of the universe is constant because no energy can enter or leave the system. We look at the the universe as one system, an isolated system where neither matter nor energy can enter or leave, hence, the energy of an isolated system remains constant and the system can't be physically change...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Jan 10, 2016 4:25 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Explanation on State Properties
Replies: 2
Views: 380

Re: Explanation on State Properties

Something is considered a state property when in order to calculate its enthalpy change, the pathway and details of the reaction are not necessary or not needed to known. It is simply calculated by where it began and where it ended. For example, temperature is a state property because you take the f...
by JudithGonzalez_1G
Sun Jan 10, 2016 4:05 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Exothermic vs. Endothermic
Replies: 8
Views: 1504

Re: Exothermic vs. Endothermic

If something is exothermic it lets go of heat so it becomes cool and its surrounding heats up. If something is endothermic it takes in heat so it becomes warmer and the surroundings become cooler. In this case, the ice pack is endothermic because it is taking in the heat from your knee and cooling d...

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