Search found 25 matches

by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Mar 13, 2016 12:43 am
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: E v. Z for 1,1-bromo-chloro-propene
Replies: 1
Views: 456

E v. Z for 1,1-bromo-chloro-propene

The diagrams at the bottom of page 106 in the course reader show two different versions of 1,1-bromo-chloro-propene where one is E and the other is Z but the bromo and chloro groups are both on the left hand side of the diagram. How does switching the positions of the H and CH3 on the right hand sid...
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Fri Mar 11, 2016 8:36 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Stability between axial and equatorial substituents
Replies: 1
Views: 227

Stability between axial and equatorial substituents

In the course reader, it says that bigger substituents have higher preference for equatorial position due to steric interactions. Do the steric interactions refer to hydrogen atoms coming off of substituents? What effect do these interactions have on the conformation?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Wed Mar 09, 2016 2:54 pm
Forum: *Ethers
Topic: ether priority
Replies: 1
Views: 421

Re: ether priority

A general rule is that the only time a functional group is not given priority when numbering is if the functional group is an ether. All other functional groups should have the lowest possible number
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:29 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: exercises in introduction to organic chemistry book #16
Replies: 1
Views: 374

Re: exercises in introduction to organic chemistry book #16

When the prefix iso- or neo- is present, it is used as part of the alphabetical ordering. On the other hand, when tert- or sec- comes before butyl, the butyl portion is used for alphabetical ordering.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:25 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Introduction to Organic Chemistry P8
Replies: 1
Views: 186

Re: Introduction to Organic Chemistry P8

4-ethyl-2,2-dimethylhexane is correct because 2<5 so this way of naming the compound would give you an overall lower number than 3-ethyl-5,5-dimethylhexane even though 3<4.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:20 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Secondary Carbons
Replies: 1
Views: 204

Secondary Carbons

On the first Quiz 3 preparation in the workbook, question 8 asks you to circle the secondary carbons of the chain CH3CH2CH2C(CH3)(CH3CHCH3)CH3. How do we know which ones are the secondary carbon atoms?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Feb 22, 2016 12:13 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Half Life Equations
Replies: 2
Views: 378

Re: Half Life Equations

When calculating half-life, [A]=1/2[A]original so when you use the equation ln[A]= -kt + ln[A]original you can plug in .5[A]original for [A] to get ln(.5[A]original)= -kt + ln([A]original) which equals ln(.5[A]original/[A]original)=-kt. The [A]original cancels out leaving you with ln(.5)=-kt
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Feb 22, 2016 12:01 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Naming with Multplie Substituents
Replies: 2
Views: 287

Naming with Multplie Substituents

On page 96 of the course reader, the name given for the first example is 4-ethyl-2,2-dimethyl-hexane. Does the 4-ethyl-2 come first because it's in alphabetical order of substituents (since prefixes don't count) or because there's only one substituent attached to the 4th carbon in the chain compared...
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:11 am
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Forward/Reverse reaction rates
Replies: 1
Views: 280

Forward/Reverse reaction rates

On page 72 in the course reader, for the example given its says to assume that A+B<-->C+D is an elementary 2nd order reaction. Should we always assume that chemical reactions with a forward and reverse process are 2nd order reactions?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:58 am
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Determining Order of the Reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 407

Re: Determining Order of the Reaction

The rate of the reaction is equal to k([R]^n). The overall order is equal to n. For reactions with multiple reactants, (ex: A+B+C->D) the rate is equal to k([A]^n x [B]^m x [C]^l) and the overall order is equal to n+m+l.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Feb 07, 2016 10:02 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: 14.9- the units
Replies: 1
Views: 290

14.9- the units

When finding the Gibbs free energy for parts a and b in problem 14.9, why are the units in J/mol instead of just J as seen in the example on page 52 of the course reader?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:52 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.9
Replies: 1
Views: 263

Re: 14.9

The number of moles in the equation to calculate Gibbs free energy are the number of moles of electrons transferred, so when you write out the half reactions for the redox in reaction you will be able to see that in part a there were 2 moles of electrons transferred and in part b there were 6 moles....
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Jan 31, 2016 11:00 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Potential Difference CR pg. 49
Replies: 1
Views: 256

Potential Difference CR pg. 49

When it says E(cathode)-E(anode)=E(cell) for the reaction with copper and zinc, the E(Cu)=0.34 and the E(Zn)=-0.76. Does the reaction and value for Zinc get flipped or would the values be plugged into the equation so the value would be 0.34-(-0.76)=1.1V?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Jan 31, 2016 10:33 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Importance of Emax
Replies: 1
Views: 332

Re: Importance of Emax

The maximum potential difference between two electrodes signifies the electromotive force (emf) which is when the reaction has very little current flow and is reversible.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Jan 24, 2016 7:08 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Biochemical systems- irreversible/reversible
Replies: 1
Views: 226

Biochemical systems- irreversible/reversible

On page 35 of the course reader, it states that biochemical reactions are often highly irreversible to speed up the process. Are there any instances in which a biochemical system would implement a reversible reaction/what would be an example?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sat Jan 23, 2016 9:14 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Work of Expansion- reversible & isothermal
Replies: 1
Views: 278

Work of Expansion- reversible & isothermal

How would you calculate the work of expansion for an ideal gas that expands reversibly and isothermally causing a change in volume and a change in pressure?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sat Jan 23, 2016 8:28 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Q's
Replies: 1
Views: 438

Re: Q's

In an ideal system, q(sys)+q(surr)=0, meaning the heat given off by the reaction should equal the heat absorbed by the solution, canceling each other out to equal zero. To find q, the equation q=mC(delta)T can be used. When a reaction is exothermic, q will be negative and when a reaction is endother...
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sat Jan 23, 2016 8:15 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat Capacity and molar mass
Replies: 1
Views: 328

Re: Heat Capacity and molar mass

Greater heat capacities don't necessarily depend on molar mass but on the molar complexity of a molecule. The more atoms that are present in a molecule, the more bond vibrations there are to absorb added energy.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Jan 10, 2016 5:24 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Changes- Melting/Boiling
Replies: 4
Views: 647

Phase Changes- Melting/Boiling

On page 17 of the course reader, it says that the temperature of a sample remains constant even though heat is being supplied for melting and boiling phase changes. I'm a little confused on how the temperature remains constant, what's the explanation behind that?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Jan 10, 2016 5:15 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Enthaly of Formation
Replies: 1
Views: 262

Re: Standard Enthaly of Formation

The standard enthalpy of formation is the standard reaction enthalpy for the formation of 1 mole of a substance. Since there are 2 moles of the product in the reaction given in the course reader, you divide the standard reaction enthalpy by 2.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Fri Nov 27, 2015 4:42 pm
Forum: *Indicators
Topic: Indicators Video
Replies: 1
Views: 5897

Indicators Video

An overview of indicators.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Nov 08, 2015 4:15 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Determining if ligands can be polydentate
Replies: 1
Views: 327

Re: Determining if ligands can be polydentate

The number of lone pairs present on each nitrogen atom can be determined by drawing out the Lewis structure for the ligand: Link to diagram of the Lewis structure: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xxtNVzFpruKS51Ya52gijr0SXVZl5POTZda4wvuXi2M/edit?usp=sharing"onclick="window.open(this.href);return ...
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Mon Oct 26, 2015 12:02 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: "Polarizing Power" Trends
Replies: 1
Views: 705

Re: "Polarizing Power" Trends

Smaller and more highly charged cations have a greater polarizing power while larger, less electronegative anions have a greater ability to become polarized.
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:51 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Biradicals
Replies: 1
Views: 347

Biradicals

Do biradicals have the same damaging effect on DNA as radicals do? If not, how do biradicals react differently?
by Kaitlin Ross 3E
Sun Oct 18, 2015 12:20 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Bridging Bonds
Replies: 1
Views: 199

Bridging Bonds

How do we determine whether a compound has bridging bonds? For example, Al2Cl6

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