Search found 26 matches

by Heerali Patel 3A
Tue Mar 08, 2016 5:25 pm
Forum: *Amines
Topic: Amides
Replies: 1
Views: 760

Re: Amides

I believe amide functional groups are usually located on the end of the carbon chain such that they can be labelled the carbon atom one.

Yes, an amide functional group has one carbon with a double bond to an oxygen and two single bonds, one of which is to a nitrogen.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Tue Mar 01, 2016 9:26 pm
Forum: *Alkenes
Topic: Quiz prep 1 #3
Replies: 1
Views: 423

Re: Quiz prep 1 #3

Yes, you must always start counting from the same side when numbering.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Sat Feb 27, 2016 9:05 am
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Common Name Origins
Replies: 1
Views: 275

Re: Common Name Origins

I believe the prefixes iso- and neo- have Greek origins in which iso- comes from the word isos, meaning equal, neo- comes from the word neos, meaning new. Tert- (tertiary) comes from the Latin word tertarius, meaning third/third part.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Feb 25, 2016 4:07 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7951
Views: 1357417

Re: Chemistry Jokes

Since it's relevant to Wednesday's lecture...

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by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:45 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Calculating Initial Amount given Rate and k
Replies: 1
Views: 374

Re: Calculating Initial Amount given Rate and k

The units of k should tell you what the order of the reaction is. You can then find the rate law of the reaction and use the given info. to solve for the (initial) concentration of the species. The question asks for initial amount in grams so you can then use the given info. to convert this concentr...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Mon Feb 08, 2016 5:43 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Question 8.51: positive vs. negative enthalpy
Replies: 1
Views: 538

Question 8.51: positive vs. negative enthalpy

Question 8.51: The enthalpy of formation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) is -67KJ/mol, and the density of TNT is 1.65 g/cm^3. In principle, it could be used as a rocket fuel, with the gases resulting from its decomposition streaming out of the rocket to give the required thrust. In practice, of course, it ...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Mon Feb 08, 2016 3:32 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: ln K equation
Replies: 2
Views: 412

Re: ln K equation

I believe the equation should be lnK=(nFE)/(RT), which includes the number of moles.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Feb 04, 2016 11:26 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Purpose of Salt Bridge
Replies: 1
Views: 409

Re: Purpose of Salt Bridge

A salt bridge maintains electrical neutrality (charge balance) so the cell does not run the reaction to equilibrium very rapidly. In addition, from page 573 in the textbook, the salt bridge also keeps the solutions from mixing and usually consists of a gel with a concentrated aqueous salt solution i...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Feb 04, 2016 11:03 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7951
Views: 1357417

Re: Chemistry Jokes

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by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Jan 28, 2016 4:00 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Bond Enthalpies
Replies: 4
Views: 1051

Re: Bond Enthalpies

Yes. Essentially, reactants are the molecules whose bonds are broken, and products are the molecules whose bonds are formed.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Jan 28, 2016 3:43 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van't Hoff equation question
Replies: 1
Views: 751

Re: Van't Hoff equation question

I believe, in general, the final temperature and respective equilibrium constant are used as T2 and K2 and the initial temperature and respective equilibrium constant as T1 and K1.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Sun Jan 24, 2016 12:26 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Spontaneity of Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 845

Re: Spontaneity of Reactions

Yes, you are correct. When delta S and delta H are both positive, a spontaneous reaction can only occur at high temperatures because this is the only way T*delta S will remain higher (in value) than delta H, such that delta G will be negative and the reaction will be spontaneous. Similarly, when bot...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:41 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 3/2 and 5/2 R
Replies: 5
Views: 1759

Re: 3/2 and 5/2 R

Camryn Marshall 1C wrote:How would we have known this without seeing it in the solutions manual? Is it listed somewhere in the textbook?


Yes! It is discussed in Section 8.10, specifically on page 281.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Jan 14, 2016 11:55 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: units of hess's law, bond enthalpy, standard enthalpy
Replies: 1
Views: 448

Re: units of hess's law, bond enthalpy, standard enthalpy

For Standard Enthalpy of Formation and Bond Enthalpy values, units will be in kJ/mol, however, these values are used to find the Standard Enthalpy of Reaction which will be in units of kJ. With Hess's Law, on the other hand, the reaction enthalpies used in each step and the overall reaction enthalpi...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Jan 07, 2016 4:46 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Sublimation in Action
Replies: 2
Views: 506

Re: Sublimation in Action

Water can also phase change through sublimation. For example (from the textbook on page 285), frost formed from cold, dry mornings disappears when the ice sublimes into water vapor.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Dec 03, 2015 3:34 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH change
Replies: 2
Views: 380

Re: pH change

Generally, salts that contain cations from groups 1 and 2 (e.g. NaCl) do not affect pH because these cations are weak lewis acids. Additionally, acidic salts (e.g. NH4Cl) will lower the pH of a solution because of the acid (NH4+ of NH4Cl) reacting with water to form H3O+, but the anion (the halogen ...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Dec 03, 2015 1:46 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: pKa v. pKa1 and pKa2
Replies: 4
Views: 29446

Re: pKa v. pKa1 and pKa2

pKa1 and pKa2 are the negative logs of the acidity constants for the first and second stage in which a polyprotic acid loses a proton. pKa(overall) is the negative log of the overall acidity constant for the overall ionization reaction of the polyprotic acid. For example, using H2CO3 as the polyprot...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:23 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: equations for the photoelectric effect
Replies: 1
Views: 437

Re: equations for the photoelectric effect

Essentially, the answer for 3b is only equivalent to the threshold energy because the problem only tells you the minimum frequency and asks for the threshold energy. This disregards the kinetic energy given for 3a since 3b only asks for threshold energy, not energy of a photon, which does not requir...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Fri Nov 20, 2015 2:30 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Order
Replies: 2
Views: 377

Re: Naming Order

When given the formula of the compound, the name is written with ligands in alphabetical order. If you are given the name and have to write the formula, usually the order is [Transition Metal...Anionic Ligand...Neutral Ligand]^charge, also keeping the ligands in alphabetical order.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:51 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Pentaaminechloronickel (lll) chloride.
Replies: 1
Views: 246

Re: Pentaaminechloronickel (lll) chloride.

The alphabetical rules applies when naming the compound. For example, if [Ni(NH3)5Cl]Cl2 were given, the answer is pentaaminechloronickel (III) chloride in which the ligands are placed in alphabetical order. However, for questions where the name is given and the formula is to be found, the order is ...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Fri Nov 06, 2015 2:35 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: MO Diagram Rules
Replies: 2
Views: 435

Re: MO Diagram Rules

The difference is that for any atom with atomic number, Z, less than 8, the MO diagram will have the sigma(pz) orbital at a higher energy than the pi(px) and pi(py) orbitals due to electron-electron repulsion. For any atom with Z greater than or equal to 8, the MO diagram will be the opposite, meani...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Oct 29, 2015 10:34 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Energy State
Replies: 1
Views: 308

Re: Energy State

This electron configuration represents the excited state of an iodine atom. You can tell because the ground state configuration would have a full 5p orbital (6 electrons) and zero unpaired electrons, given this is the lowest energy state possible for iodine. In this case, one valence electron has mo...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Fri Oct 23, 2015 7:37 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Homework 3.57b
Replies: 1
Views: 338

Re: Homework 3.57b

Technically, the hydrogen can be attached to the double-bonded oxygen, but it is preferable to attach it to the single-bonded oxygen because this gives a formal charge of zero for that oxygen. The hydrogen bonded to the double-bonded oxygen gives that oxygen a formal charge of -1, however, a zero fo...
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:46 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: #43 e) homework question: electron configuration tungsten
Replies: 1
Views: 533

Re: #43 e) homework question: electron configuration tungste

Although Tungsten is located in the 6th group and the 6th period on the periodic table, the f-block begins in the 4th shell. This means that the electron configuration for Tungsten will contain the 4th shell of the f orbital, labelled 4f.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2015 3:34 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Removing 2nd Electron
Replies: 2
Views: 492

Re: Removing 2nd Electron

The second electron that would be removed is generally closer to the nucleus of an atom. For this reason, it has a stronger pull acting upon it by the nucleus than the first electron does. This stronger pull makes removing the second electron harder.
by Heerali Patel 3A
Thu Oct 01, 2015 3:46 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Exact numbers in the final answers
Replies: 4
Views: 756

Re: Exact numbers in the final answers

Usually, with multi-step problems, you only round for the final answer to avoid the slight differences that occur in the answers if you were to round with every calculation. This also helps with getting a greater accuracy regarding theoretical yields and actual yields.

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