Search found 20 matches

by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Mar 11, 2016 6:20 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Z/E for Chair
Replies: 2
Views: 418

Re: Z/E for Chair

By saying they have to be going in the same direction for Z, it means the two substituents have to both be in the up direction or both in the down direction. Even if they are on opposite sides of the molecule, it is important to note if it is Z or E because they denote different molecules.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Mar 06, 2016 9:25 pm
Forum: *Cyclopropanes and Cyclobutanes
Topic: Bond Angle Strain vs. Torsional Strain
Replies: 8
Views: 1259

Re: Bond Angle Strain vs. Torsional Strain

When atoms are physically bumping into each other, this is a different kind of strain called steric strain. This in addition to torsional and bond angle strain will make up the difference in potential energy from one conformation to another.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Feb 26, 2016 11:46 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Double Headed Arrow
Replies: 4
Views: 611

Re: Double Headed Arrow

Double-headed arrows are used to show the transfer of two electrons from one lace to another while a single-headed arrow is one. Generally, the only time a single-headed arrow will be used is when dealing with radicals. Double-headed arrows will be more common since they will result in the formation...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Feb 21, 2016 5:17 pm
Forum: *Free Energy of Activation vs Activation Energy
Topic: Entropy
Replies: 1
Views: 263

Re: Entropy

The reason the delta S is a negative value for reactants to a transition state is because the transition state is actually more stable than the reactants. This is because the reactants are connected by hybrid bonds in the transition state, reducing the total number of molecules in the system. This r...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Feb 12, 2016 8:54 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Why K isn't determinant on reactants?
Replies: 3
Views: 424

Re: Why K isn't determinant on reactants?

The reason k is not affected is because it is a constant. This means it will remain the same under various conditions.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Feb 05, 2016 10:06 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: First and Second Order Reaction Graphs
Replies: 1
Views: 349

Re: First and Second Order Reaction Graphs

In the derivation for the first order equation, the negative remains throughout. This makes the final graph of ln[A] vs. time negative and linear. In the derivation for the second order reaction, the negative is phased out. The result of this is a final graph of 1/[A] vs. time positive and linear.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Jan 31, 2016 1:46 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Identifying Which Half-Reaction to Reverse
Replies: 3
Views: 371

Re: Identifying Which Half-Reaction to Reverse

Of course a negative net voltage is possible for a galvanic cell, it simply means so many volts of electricity need to be put into the system in order to have the reaction proceed in the set direction.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Jan 24, 2016 5:57 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Which is more stable, Fe3O4 or Fe2O3?
Replies: 1
Views: 908

Re: Which is more stable, Fe3O4 or Fe2O3?

The reason for this comes when looking at what G stands for. G is a measure of Gibbs Free Energy, or a measure involving the changes of heat and entropy in relation to temperature. When there is no change in heat or entropy, or in the most stable state possible, the delta G is equal to 0. The reason...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Jan 17, 2016 5:14 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Question about Closed Systems vs Isolated System
Replies: 2
Views: 357

Re: Question about Closed Systems vs Isolated System

Not only is an isolated system very difficult to create, it is actually impossible to create a 100% isolated system. The reason for this is there will always be at least one part of the system in contact with something of higher or lower energy. An example of this would be why absolute zero has not ...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Jan 10, 2016 10:18 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Standard State
Replies: 3
Views: 319

Re: Standard State

The standard states of elements are when they are in their most stable natural form at 25 degrees Celsius and 1 atmosphere of pressure as well as 1 mole of the molecule. For some elements, (Br, N, Cl, H, O, and F) the most stable natural form is a diatomic molecule.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2015 11:26 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty picture
Replies: 1
Views: 248

Uncertainty picture

Image

I find this image very helpful in understanding the significance and implications of the uncertainty equation. I hope it cn bring you all a bit of insight.
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:57 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Drawing the structure of conjugate acid that can be formed
Replies: 1
Views: 374

Re: Drawing the structure of conjugate acid that can be form

In part a), it should be fairly obvious that thymine will be able to accept two protons. This means for part b), there are two different structures of conjugate bases that can be formed, one with one proton accepted and the other with two. In part c), the structure that has amphiprotic behavior is t...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:23 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to know if something dissolves into an Acid or Base
Replies: 2
Views: 336

Re: How to know if something dissolves into an Acid or Base

In determining whether a molecule will dissolve to form an acidic or basic solution, it is easiest to write out a chemical equation in which the molecule reacts with water. When you do this, it should generally be clear what type of solution you will have based on the resulting products. If the reac...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:34 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Finding Conjugate Acids and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 425

Re: Finding Conjugate Acids and Bases

When you're trying to find a conjugate acid or a conjugate base of a molecule that has multiple H's, how do you know which one to take away/add to? For example, finding the conjugate base of CH3COOH? Excellent question. The answer to this is actually far simpler than it may first appear. In order t...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Nov 06, 2015 5:44 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium constants
Replies: 3
Views: 500

Re: Equilibrium constants

Solids are not factored into equilibrium constant calculations because of the nature of how the equilibrium constant is calculated and the nature of solids themselves. To calculate the equilibrium constant, the concentration of products is divided by the concentration of reactants. Solids themselves...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Oct 30, 2015 10:26 pm
Forum: NEWS & RESOURCES
Topic: MO Z<8 vs Z>/=8
Replies: 2
Views: 1631

Re: MO Z<8 vs Z>/=8

The reason for this has to due with the electron repulsion between the s sigma * orbital and the next highest orbital. In molecules with an atom that is Z<8, the molecular orbital structure that accounts for the lowest possible energy state has the p pi orbitals in a lower position than the p sigma ...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Oct 23, 2015 5:50 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Lecture 10/23 on Hybridization of Ethene
Replies: 1
Views: 333

Re: Lecture 10/23 on Hybridization of Ethene

For acetylene, or rather ethyne, there are two regions of electron density surrounding each carbon atom, meaning they will have 2sp hybridization for its sigma-bonding orbitals. This leaves two electrons per carbon atom, each occupying an unpaired 2p orbital. This means on each carbon atom, there is...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VESPR bond angles
Replies: 4
Views: 482

Re: VESPR bond angles

Once you determine the general 3-D layout of a compound, you can use geometry to calculate the bond angles between atoms. For example, in PCl5 the layout of the compound has one trigonal planar structure and one axial linear structure perpendicular to the former, creating a trigonal bipyramidal shap...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Oct 09, 2015 4:56 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: H, He, Li, and Be Octet Rule
Replies: 3
Views: 1588

Re: H, He, Li, and Be Octet Rule

Additionally, the H atom does not necessarily need to fill its valence shell when forming ionic bonds. For example in an HF molecule, the H atom is the cation, meaning it has given up its single valence electron to bond with the F atom. By doing this, the H atom does not have a full valence shell, b...
by Shaye Busse 3B
Fri Oct 02, 2015 7:06 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's equation and Heisenberg's equation
Replies: 4
Views: 612

Re: De Broglie's equation and Heisenberg's equation

Additionally, when Heisenberg's equation is intended to be used to determine the approximate velocity and subsequently the approximate momentum of extremely small particles, such as electrons. This is the experiment used to find these value is uncertain in its results due to the nature of the electr...

Go to advanced search