Search found 26 matches

by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:53 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: hydrogens in conformation
Replies: 1
Views: 254

Re: hydrogens in conformation

I think its only needed there to differentiate axial and equatorial, but you don't have to for line drawings.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:50 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 2012 practice final#2A
Replies: 3
Views: 436

Re: 2012 practice final#2A

The case is initially at 1.00 atm, taking into account the change in pressure later in the problem, while the safe is isolated.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:43 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: E/Z
Replies: 1
Views: 249

Re: E/Z

E and Z refer to 2 specific substituents across a constant plane, so in the case of 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane you would have biz or trans relative to two of the methyl groups, which would be determines based on which side of the plane created by the cyclohexane they lie on.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:41 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Residual entropy
Replies: 1
Views: 398

Re: Residual entropy

NO has a greater number of conformations as BF3 can only be configured one way, therefore it will have the higher residual entropy.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:39 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Final 2015 7A
Replies: 3
Views: 442

Re: Final 2015 7A

There will never be a negative rate for the reaction so k is always positive.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:32 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Determining rate of formation
Replies: 1
Views: 298

Re: Determining rate of formation

We will always told which is the slow or fast, and the slow reaction determines the rate since the fast reaction happens so quickly that its rate is not as accurate a representation of the overall rate as the reaction which takes more time to complete.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:28 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 15.65
Replies: 1
Views: 253

Re: 15.65

YOOOO whats good Camryn :) Sicne EA' < EA, there has to be additional energy absorbed from the surroundings in order for the reaction to proceed, so its endothermic.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:19 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Bonds Breaking and Bonds Forming
Replies: 1
Views: 326

Re: Bonds Breaking and Bonds Forming

While the dotted line represents where the molecule will separate or fuse, the line itself does not indicate whether that bond is forming or breaking.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:18 pm
Forum: *Free Energy of Activation vs Activation Energy
Topic: Activation Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 407

Re: Activation Energy

Similar to Gibbs Free Energy and Enthalpy, the Activation Energy of a reaction pertains to that specific reaction while the Standard Activation Energy is the energy required per mole of substance.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Tue Jan 26, 2016 8:46 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Quiz 1 #7 (2014)
Replies: 1
Views: 314

Re: Quiz 1 #7 (2014)

For this problem you know that H20 will prefer to exist as a solid at -1, will have no preference at 0, and will prefer to exist as a liquid at 1, so using that knowledge to approximate values for the enthalpy and entropy, you will get the respective answers for each temperature.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Tue Jan 26, 2016 8:41 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Isothermal and Reversible
Replies: 2
Views: 307

Isothermal and Reversible

If a reaction is said only to be isothermal do we assume that it is an irreversible reaction or are all isothermal reactions reversible?
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Mon Jan 18, 2016 12:51 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Different Types of Calorimeters
Replies: 1
Views: 528

Re: Different Types of Calorimeters

A bomb calorimeter is used for constant volume calorimetry, while constant pressure calorimetry gives us the enthalpy values for that function.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Mon Jan 18, 2016 12:40 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Microstates
Replies: 1
Views: 198

Microstates

I'm still having a little trouble understanding what the "left" and "right" in microstates are and was hoping someone could explain their significance.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:52 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: ClO2- Ion Shape
Replies: 1
Views: 571

Re: ClO2- Ion Shape

I believe that the double bonds allow the Cl and the O to all have formal charges of 0, which is why they are preferred over a single bond with 3 lone pairs.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:48 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 2012 Final #6B
Replies: 3
Views: 520

Re: 2012 Final #6B

I believe that the volume was 1.072L, so that is essentially what they were doing. In the answers it was just all left in there in order to not break up the (0.05-x).
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:36 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Moles or molarity in an ICE chart
Replies: 1
Views: 3801

Re: Moles or molarity in an ICE chart

since Molarity is just mol/V, as long as moles are used consistently throughout the problem and the final answer is divided by the volume in order to produce a final answer as a concentration, it should still work.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:34 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Question on 2012 Final Sample
Replies: 2
Views: 730

Re: Question on 2012 Final Sample

n=3, l=1

This is asking how many 3p electrons there are: 6

n=5, l=3, ml=-1

This refers to a specific sub-orbital within 5f, which has 2 electrons.

n=2, l=1, ml=0

This refers to a suborbital of 2p, which will have 2 electrons as well.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:24 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Is OH aqua or hydroxo?
Replies: 2
Views: 472

Re: Is OH aqua or hydroxo?

(OH)- is hydroxo, while aqua is (H2O). Perhaps in the final it is written as (OH2)?
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sun Nov 29, 2015 11:06 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Dilution of Aqueous Solutions
Replies: 1
Views: 343

Re: Dilution of Aqueous Solutions

For basic dilution problems, you have to divide by the new volume because molarity is defined as moles over volume. You calculate the number of moles from original and divide by the new volume.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sun Nov 15, 2015 2:48 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Partial Pressure when calculating Equilibrium Constants
Replies: 1
Views: 331

Re: Partial Pressure when calculating Equilibrium Constants

Yes, since the equation for calculating Kp requires the partial pressures of each individual gas, you would need to calculate them using the mole fractions.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:31 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Real Gas Behavior
Replies: 1
Views: 261

Re: Real Gas Behavior

Yes, decreasing the pressure or increasing the temperature would cause the molecules to move further apart, which would cause more ideal behavior within the gas.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sun Nov 08, 2015 9:39 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Complex
Replies: 1
Views: 254

Re: Chelating Complex

I believe that it can be identifiable by lone pairs and the VSEPR shape, which determines how close the ligands are, although there are probably exceptions.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Fri Oct 30, 2015 4:14 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization
Replies: 2
Views: 395

Re: hybridization

To my understanding, the central atom in a molecule will almost always be hybridized, and this isn't a revision but rather a more accurate representation of how the electrons are shared within the orbitals and how the atoms interact.
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sat Oct 24, 2015 2:11 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: When to use Double and Triple Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 6011

Re: When to use Double and Triple Bonds

The use of double or triple bonds will largely be dependent on the number of valence electrons present as well as the number of bonds a central atom is likely to form. For example, O2 is double bonded because there are 12 valence electrons and oxygen can form 2 covalent bonds, so the presence of the...
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Wed Oct 14, 2015 6:12 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures with multiple joined molecules
Replies: 1
Views: 262

Re: Lewis Structures with multiple joined molecules

For the specific example that you provided (CH3OH), the Hydrogen has to branch off of the Oxygen instead of the central Carbon because Hydrogen can only form one bond, so if you had 4 Hydrogen atoms branching off of the central Carbon, then the Oxygen would have to be bonded to one of those Hydrogen...
by Suraj Palaparty 2F
Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:02 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 1
Views: 215

Work Function

What factors determine the value of the work function? I didn't quite understand if that was a value given to us or if it was something we were able to calculate.

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