Search found 16 matches

by PwintN 2H
Sat Mar 12, 2016 7:07 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: O-Chem numbering rules
Replies: 1
Views: 266

O-Chem numbering rules

What are the rules for numbering substituents, functioning groups, and double/triple bonds?

I thought we just had to get the lowest number (1) and start numbering from there, but answers questions in the Intro to O-Chem book has proven otherwise.
by PwintN 2H
Sun Mar 06, 2016 9:32 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Intro to O-Chem problems 1.25 and 1.26
Replies: 1
Views: 393

Intro to O-Chem problems 1.25 and 1.26

For problem 1.25, is the alkene both cis and trans because all the highest connecting element is carbon? The answer states it could be either cis or trans. For problem 1.26, why is the alkene trans? Bromine is the highest connecting element, but the rest are carbons, so it could either be cis or tra...
by PwintN 2H
Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:48 am
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Common Name Origins
Replies: 1
Views: 301

Common Name Origins

What is the origin for the prefixes iso-, neo-, tert-?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Feb 21, 2016 9:22 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: CR example on page 87
Replies: 1
Views: 346

CR example on page 87

For the example involving cholesterol, why is HBr attached to the cholesterol attached as H Br but rather Br H?

Also, what is the product of this reaction called?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Feb 14, 2016 11:14 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Course Reader page 75
Replies: 2
Views: 494

Course Reader page 75

For Step 2 (slow step), how does k = 2k2K = 2k1k2/k'1?
by PwintN 2H
Fri Feb 05, 2016 2:16 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Thermodynamics: Second and Third Law STUDY GUIDE
Replies: 1
Views: 392

Thermodynamics: Second and Third Law STUDY GUIDE

Hello, everyone! I have created a sort of study for the second section for 14B. This is a neat rendition of notes I was taking when doing textbook problems. So, most of the information is derived from the solutions manual and a little bit from the course reader. Please don't mind the inaccuracies an...
by PwintN 2H
Sun Jan 31, 2016 10:14 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Week 4 WED Lecture
Replies: 1
Views: 184

Week 4 WED Lecture

On Wednesday's lecture, Professor Lavelle mentions how SO42- and SO42- is used to to prevent build up of positive charge in the anode and negative charge in the cathode via a salt bridge or porous disc. How exactly does it prevent the build up?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Jan 24, 2016 3:41 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Course Reader pg. 39
Replies: 1
Views: 374

Course Reader pg. 39

On page 39 in the CR, there is a chart for RXN or Physical Change and determining what conditions lead to spontaneous rxns. For deltaS positive and deltaH positive, it says rxn or physical change is spontaneous at high temperatures. What is considered a "high" temperature? Same thing for d...
by PwintN 2H
Sun Jan 17, 2016 1:51 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Calorimeter equations
Replies: 2
Views: 513

Calorimeter equations

During lecture, Dr. Lavelle wrote on the board the equation: q=C sp deltaT, which can be used for finding specific heat. However in the textbook, the equations regarding calorimeters are different. The equations given are q cal =C cal deltaT (for heat gained by calorimeter) and -q=C cal deltaT (for ...
by PwintN 2H
Sun Jan 10, 2016 8:11 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Calorimeter Process
Replies: 1
Views: 335

Calorimeter Process

How does a calorimeter work to measure specific heat? Not in terms of calculations, but in terms of process and in practice.
by PwintN 2H
Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:21 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Roles of OH- and H3O+ in maintaing autoprotolysis
Replies: 1
Views: 342

Roles of OH- and H3O+ in maintaing autoprotolysis

How does a small concentration of OH- in a solution of a weak acid maintain the autoprotolysis equilibrium? Likewise, how does a small concentration of H3O+ ions in a solution of a weak base maintain the autoprotolysis equilibrium?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Nov 29, 2015 7:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VIDEO: Quick Review of VSEPR and Polarity
Replies: 1
Views: 325

VIDEO: Quick Review of VSEPR and Polarity

The video is a quick review of VSEPR and Polarity, so you don't have to have to read the book!
by PwintN 2H
Sun Nov 22, 2015 9:39 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Acids and Bases e.g. in CR page 132
Replies: 1
Views: 418

Acids and Bases e.g. in CR page 132

The example given in the Course Reader on pg 132 is: HCl(aq) + H2O(l) <-> H3O+(aq) + Cl-(aq) In this example, HCl is a strong acid but it the reaction is in equilibrium. Is the property of a strong acid to dissociate completely? If so, does that mean that the reaction should not be in equilibrium?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Nov 08, 2015 6:09 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: What happens to the rxn when a product/reactant is reduced?
Replies: 2
Views: 475

What happens to the rxn when a product/reactant is reduced?

Suppose a rxn looks like A + B <-> C
What happens to the overall equilibrium rxn if the product (C) is reduced? If (A) is reduced, what happens to (B)?
by PwintN 2H
Sun Oct 25, 2015 10:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond type and resonance
Replies: 1
Views: 242

Bond type and resonance

Because a single bond is a sigma bond, a double bond is a sigma and pi bond, and a triple bond is a sigma and two pi bonds, what happens when there is resonance? For example is there is resonance and a bond is somewhere between a double and a single bond, what would be the bond type?
by PwintN 2H
Sat Oct 17, 2015 8:35 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: L35: What does t mean?
Replies: 1
Views: 1041

L35: What does t mean?

The problem L35 asks what mass of iron in kg is needed to produce 2.50 t of NaBr. According to the solution manual, t is equal to 1000 kg. As kg stands for kilogram, what does t stand for?

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