Search found 20 matches

by 304621080
Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:53 am
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Electrophile/Nucleophile
Replies: 3
Views: 525

Re: Electrophile/Nucleophile

Another way to tell is by using delta negative and delta positives. For example, a hydrogen bromide molecule is a great example. Since bromine has a stronger electronegative pull on the atoms being shared it is delta negative making the hydrogen delta positive.
by 304621080
Mon Feb 29, 2016 11:27 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Quiz 3 Preparation Page 43, Question 4
Replies: 3
Views: 366

Re: Quiz 3 Preparation Page 43, Question 4

It would be acceptable if you draw the nonane chain as a standard 9-carbon chain with the 3 substituents because that is the simpler way to draw it but both are the same. It is just a matter of redrawing.
by 304621080
Wed Feb 24, 2016 8:37 pm
Forum: *Free Energy of Activation vs Activation Energy
Topic: Why Transition States always have Positive Enthalpy
Replies: 2
Views: 424

Re: Why Transition States always have Positive Enthalpy

The transition state has a positive enthalpy value because it requires energy to break the bonds resulting in an endergonic reaction.
by 304621080
Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:05 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Quiz 2 2014 #11
Replies: 3
Views: 403

Re: Quiz 2 2014 #11

B is zero order because when the rates are equal to each other when finding the answer it results in log 1 which is 0. so anything divided by 0 is 0. Then, because you know that b is zero order, you also know that it is not include in the rate law. When you go to find the order of C, you do not have...
by 304621080
Tue Feb 09, 2016 3:10 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Winter 2012 Q7A&B
Replies: 1
Views: 241

Winter 2012 Q7A&B

I am confused about Winter 2012 Q7A&B and Winter 2013 Q7 because the overall cell potential is negative and I thought that you always want a positive cell potential? Is there a special rule I am unaware of?
by 304621080
Wed Feb 03, 2016 9:22 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Inert Electrode
Replies: 1
Views: 236

Inert Electrode

When talking about including an inert electrode such as Pt in the cell diagram, can it be said that if there isn't a solid on both sides of the reaction, you should include Pt an inert electrode?
by 304621080
Mon Feb 01, 2016 12:08 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Predicting Gibbs Free Energy Sign
Replies: 3
Views: 320

Re: Predicting Gibbs Free Energy Sign

No, because it is also dependent on the enthalpy of the reaction.
by 304621080
Wed Jan 20, 2016 8:59 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Using PV=nRT to solve for internal energy
Replies: 1
Views: 460

Re: Using PV=nRT to solve for internal energy

Although the problem does not explicitly tell you it is an ideal gas; however, the key hint is that you are given moles which hints that you have to exchange P(Delta)V to (Delta)nPT in finding the change in internal energy.
by 304621080
Thu Jan 14, 2016 12:59 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Work Calculations
Replies: 2
Views: 486

Re: Work Calculations

For the equation w=(-Pext)(DeltaV), the conditions need to be irreversible and under constant pressure. For the equation w=-nRT(ln(Vf/Vi)), the conditions need to be reversible and isothermic.
by 304621080
Sat Jan 09, 2016 4:01 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Enthalpies of Formation
Replies: 1
Views: 198

Re: Standard Enthalpies of Formation

In the course reader, Lavelle has an example using C(s) in which it is referring to the standard form graphite. I believe C(s) would be the best and most efficient way to write the form.
by 304621080
Tue Dec 01, 2015 9:53 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Clarification of lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 676

Re: Clarification of lone pairs

Correct! Think of them as electron clouds.
by 304621080
Sun Nov 29, 2015 7:55 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant figures in Ch.12
Replies: 1
Views: 337

Re: Significant figures in Ch.12

My TA explained that you should prolong rounding your answer until the very end of your calculations to ensure the accuracy of your answer. But with regards to the significant figures, it should be two since the questions themselves have two significant figures. On the final, that is what should be ...
by 304621080
Mon Nov 16, 2015 12:35 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: From Words to Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 287

Re: From Words to Equation

Yes, you organize the ligands based off of the alphabetical order of the ligands names.
by 304621080
Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:26 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming of Fe(CO)5
Replies: 2
Views: 265

Re: Naming of Fe(CO)5

My TA explained that you use iron when the compound does not have an overall charge. However, when the compound has an overall charge of 1- or any other negative charge you would use ferrate to account for the negative charge.
by 304621080
Thu Nov 05, 2015 6:38 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Valence Electron Configuration
Replies: 2
Views: 395

Valence Electron Configuration

For the valence electron configuration, is it okay to write (π2P)^3 or do we have to specify by writing (π2Px)^2(π2Py)^1?
by 304621080
Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:50 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Determining how Paramagnetic an atom is
Replies: 1
Views: 268

Re: Determining how Paramagnetic an atom is

The more unpaired electrons that an element has in its orbitals the more paramagnetic the element becomes.
by 304621080
Tue Oct 20, 2015 10:02 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: How to determine which element is the "central" element
Replies: 3
Views: 2657

Re: How to determine which element is the "central" element

When determining the central element in a compound, the most important factor is electronegativity. Electronegativity increases as you go up a group and to the right of a period. The element with the smallest electronegativity is the element that will be the central element. Since, N has a smaller e...
by 304621080
Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:42 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ground State Electron Configuration for Ions
Replies: 3
Views: 822

Ground State Electron Configuration for Ions

Question number 3.19 in the book for chemistry 14A has a part d in which the question is to write the ground state electron configuration for Br-. After coming up with the solution [Ar]3d10,4s2,4p6 the book solution manual put it as [Kr]. I understand that the book solution is saying the molecule is...
by 304621080
Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:09 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Sequence of elements in the molecular formula
Replies: 1
Views: 323

Sequence of elements in the molecular formula

When calculating the molecular formula, does the order of elements affect the answer? Some problems give the name of the compound element, for example caffeine; but, do no give the outline of the formula (CHNO). So, I was curious if the elements are listed in the proper order they appear in or if th...
by 304621080
Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:45 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1.3 manipulating light equations
Replies: 3
Views: 579

Re: 1.3 manipulating light equations

The best way about focusing on this question is thinking about it in terms of the slope. As the frequency decreases, so does the extent of the change because the wave elongates creating a decrease in the slope. With respect to energy, if you combine the equation E=hv(v being frequency) and c=wavelen...

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