Search found 20 matches

by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Mar 11, 2016 11:18 pm
Forum: *Cyclopropanes and Cyclobutanes
Topic: Electrophile/Nucleophile CO2
Replies: 1
Views: 779

Electrophile/Nucleophile CO2

Is CO2 electrophile or nucleophile and how do you tell?
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Mar 07, 2016 3:50 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Cis and trans Vs. Z and E
Replies: 3
Views: 470

Re: Cis and trans Vs. Z and E

Yes they are the same, cis = Z, trans = E.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Feb 29, 2016 9:43 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Tert and Iso
Replies: 1
Views: 242

Re: Tert and Iso

Yeah, youre assumption is right.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Wed Feb 24, 2016 7:55 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Common names vs. (iso and neo)
Replies: 1
Views: 213

Re: Common names vs. (iso and neo)

iso a neu are just an alternate way of naming aside from IUPAC. I'm not sure how they grade it, but both would be right unless specified is what I would think
by Matthew Oh 3I
Wed Feb 17, 2016 4:30 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Units of K
Replies: 1
Views: 274

Re: Units of K

It means the same thing, it doesnt matter.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Wed Feb 17, 2016 4:10 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: bond enthalpies
Replies: 2
Views: 406

Re: bond enthalpies

I believe that you must break the bond first, then a double bond forms.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Tue Feb 09, 2016 3:35 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Midterm 2015 #8C
Replies: 1
Views: 430

Re: Midterm 2015 #8C

The O's and H's are going to be -2 and +1 respectively. So the only one that changes is the C. C is a change in oxidation state, the only one in the equation, from C6H12O6 to CO2, so we only worry about one, and we choose CO2, so we take the electrons from there.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Feb 01, 2016 2:59 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: oxidizing agent
Replies: 1
Views: 237

Re: oxidizing agent

The oxidizing agent gains electron in a chemical reaction whereas the reducing agent loses electrons in a chemical reaction.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Thu Jan 28, 2016 4:36 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Extensive and Intensive
Replies: 4
Views: 528

Extensive and Intensive

I'm still a little confused as to what extensive and intensive properties are and how to distinguish them
by Matthew Oh 3I
Sun Jan 24, 2016 9:45 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Spontaneity
Replies: 1
Views: 301

Re: Spontaneity

The negative in S cancels out the subtraction. But since it is spontaneous at low temp so the TdS will be very small since the T is low. Since the H is negative only a little positive from TdS will be added and the dG will still be negative, making it a spontaneous reaction.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Sun Jan 10, 2016 10:18 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: State function
Replies: 2
Views: 247

State function

I am confused as to what a state function or state property is. I understand that temperature and enthalpy are state functions but am unsure as to what it means.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Nov 30, 2015 3:03 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant Figures given Kc
Replies: 1
Views: 765

Re: Significant Figures given Kc

I'm pretty sure that it should be four sig figs because a constant shouldn't affect the number of sig figs.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Nov 23, 2015 3:30 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Video: balancing chemical equations
Replies: 2
Views: 652

Re: Video: balancing chemical equations

Balanching Equations video by Matthew Oh and Natalia Dudek. Discussion 4L.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Mon Nov 23, 2015 2:41 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Using the variable X in the Ice Box
Replies: 2
Views: 1111

Re: Using the variable X in the Ice Box

The first thing you said was correct, the coefficient of X is equivalent to the number of moles in the molecule or atom. But the reactants aren't always negative and the products not always positive. If the reaction begins with only reactants then it will favor the products and proceed to the right,...
by Matthew Oh 3I
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:27 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 1
Views: 290

Naming

When do you use bis- and tris-... and when you write the compound out in alphabetical order, does that come into play or does only the molecule count?
by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Nov 13, 2015 4:53 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Midterm question
Replies: 1
Views: 591

Re: Midterm question

First find the amount of grams in each C, H, and O. First you find C and H using stoichiomentry with CO2 and H2O. Then with those values you subtract the g of C and H from the 0.105g. Then you find the moles of each and then use ratios which gives you C3H2O... For part 2 you find the grams of C3H2O ...
by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Oct 30, 2015 12:45 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 2
Views: 309

Polarizability

Im a little confused as to what polarizability tells us. I understand that ions like I- are highly polarizable because it has a large shell and many electrons which aren't held in very well. But what exactly does this tell us?
by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Oct 23, 2015 3:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: How to tell from whether it is covalent or ionic
Replies: 3
Views: 555

Re: How to tell from whether it is covalent or ionic

Covalent bond is when two atoms share electrons. Ionic bond is when an electron is given up or accepted; the ions are attracted to one another because they have opposite charges.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:23 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: 2 Questions from M. Limiting Reactants
Replies: 5
Views: 2821

Re: 2 Questions from M. Limiting Reactants

1. In a combustion equation, only Carbon Dioxide, Water, and Energy are produced. So the second analysis is to tell you how much of it is composed of nitrogen.
by Matthew Oh 3I
Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:15 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: How do you go from meter to nanometer? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 1742

Re: How do you go from meter to nanometer? [ENDORSED]

This is just a simple conversion. 1 nanometer is equivalent to 10^-9 meters.
Your conversion equation should be: (3.4 x 10^-7 m) x ((1nm)/(10^-9m))... The meters cancel out and your answer should be 340 nm.

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