Search found 21 matches

by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:05 am
Forum: *Amines
Topic: naming of amines
Replies: 1
Views: 647

Re: naming of amines

The N is used when naming a secondary or tertiary amine, meaning there are two or three alkyl groups respectively attached to the N. When there is a secondary or tertiary amine, N indicates the alkyl group bonded to the N. N,N dimethylmethanamine for example demonstrates (CH₃)₃N. Since there are thr...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:37 am
Forum: *Aldehydes
Topic: Aldehydes vs. Ketones
Replies: 2
Views: 915

Re: Aldehydes vs. Ketones

An aldehyde has a hydrogen attached to the carbon oxgyen double bond. A ketone does not have this hydrogen.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:01 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Questions regarding quiz 3
Replies: 2
Views: 345

Re: Questions regarding quiz 3

I believe either the common name and IUPAC name are acceptable. The quiz 3 preparation answers have already been posted under the Administrative/Class Announcements section. The post is titled Quiz 3 Winter 2017. If you just scroll down you will find that the answers have been posted.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:41 am
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: pre equilibrium approach
Replies: 2
Views: 391

Re: pre equilibrium approach

The pre-equilibrium approach is used to find an expression for the rate of product formed. It is used when the first step of the reaction is the faster step. This is in contrast to the steany state method in which the first step is the slow step. Furthermore, the pre-equilibrium approach is used whe...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Feb 19, 2017 10:30 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Graph of First Order Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 306

Graph of First Order Reactions

Why do we graph ln[A] versus time for first order reactions?
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Thu Feb 09, 2017 12:50 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Gas Constant Question
Replies: 1
Views: 290

Re: Gas Constant Question

On the formula sheet there are multiple different gas constants listed that are all different. Notice, however that the units for each are different as well. For example, there is 8.314 J/K×mol and 8.206×10-2 L×atm/K×Mol. Depending on the problem and other values you have, you want to use the gas co...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Fri Feb 03, 2017 4:52 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Extensive v Intensive
Replies: 2
Views: 399

Re: Extensive v Intensive

Since intensive properties do not depend on the amount of substance, the entire system can be described with two independent intensive variables. Intensive properties can also be useful in identifying chemical substances because intensive properties do not change as the quantity of the substance cha...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:23 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Returning Finals
Replies: 2
Views: 501

Re: Returning Finals

I don't think an exact date was given, but the finals are supposed to be available week 3 winter quarter from 4006 Young Hall.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Jan 22, 2017 12:54 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Entropy and Degeneracy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 437

Re: Entropy and Degeneracy [ENDORSED]

Degeneracy (W) is the number of ways to achieve a given energy state. Entropy (S) describes the the probability that the system will be in a particular state. The Boltzmann equation describes the relationship between degeneracy and entropy. S=kB ln W, where kB is Boltzmann's constant. This equation ...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Wed Jan 18, 2017 10:37 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Units [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 774

Re: Units [ENDORSED]

Usually, the chemical reaction is in kj because each reaction has a varying ratio and number of moles. The question can ask, however, what the change per mole is for either the product or reactant. In that case, divide the kj quantity accordingly to find kj/mol.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Fri Dec 02, 2016 10:43 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: seesaw shape question [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 408

Re: seesaw shape question [ENDORSED]

The seesaw shape means that there are four bonds and one lone pair. The bond angles are 90, 120, and 180.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:35 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Writing Reaction Equation for Polyprotic Acids/Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 602

Writing Reaction Equation for Polyprotic Acids/Bases

In the course reader, page 158, in order to determine the overall reaction, there are two steps shown. In the first equation, one proton is donated and then another in the second equation. By adding these equations together, the final (overall reaction) equation is found. Does this need to be done t...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Nov 20, 2016 4:53 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K=1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 345

Re: K=1 [ENDORSED]

An equilibrium constant of K=1 means that neither the reactants or products are being favored in the reaction. This means that the amount of reactants and products is pretty much the same which does not happen often.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:00 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Shifts
Replies: 1
Views: 356

Re: Equilibrium Shifts

The equilibrium constant will change when there is a change in temperature. If the reaction is endothermic, then the equilibrium constant will increase because the forward reaction is favored. This means that the concentration of products will increase, but the concentration of reactants will stay t...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sun Nov 13, 2016 3:26 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Calculating K
Replies: 4
Views: 461

Re: Calculating K

Liquids and solids are not included when trying to find the equilibrium constant. The molar concentration of a pure solid or liquid will not change in a reaction and therefore are disregarded.
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:00 am
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Molecular Orbital Theory
Replies: 4
Views: 539

Re: Molecular Orbital Theory

An anti-bonding orbital is a type of molecular orbital. When the anti-bonding orbital is filled with electrons, the bond between the two atoms is weaker. This relates to molecular orbital theory because it helps us determine the strength between bonds (on a more specific level) as opposed to just ba...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Fri Oct 28, 2016 9:42 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Dipole moments
Replies: 1
Views: 384

Dipole moments

How can you identify a dipole moment and how do they relate to polarity?
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sat Oct 22, 2016 4:22 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Exceptions for Electron Configurations
Replies: 3
Views: 2699

Exceptions for Electron Configurations

What is the electron configuration for Cu2+ and what is the exception for writing the configurations for copper and chromium?
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Sat Oct 15, 2016 8:18 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Shrodinger's Equation and Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 337

Shrodinger's Equation and Orbitals

What is the relationship between Shrodinger's wave funtion and orbitals?
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Tue Oct 11, 2016 7:16 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodes [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 722

Re: Nodes [ENDORSED]

There are two types of nodes: angular nodes and radial nodes. Angular nodes are surfaces where there is no electron density, and radial nodes are spherical shells where there is no electron density. In order to determine the number of nodes total the equation would be n-1. The number of angular node...
by Manali Ghadiali 1E
Fri Sep 30, 2016 5:16 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: sig figs in addition problems
Replies: 1
Views: 475

Re: sig figs in addition problems

The rule for determining significant figures with addition and subtraction problems is to round to the place of the least accurate number. This doesn't necessarily limit the rounding of significant figures to decimal places, but simply to the least accurate place. Example: 223.2 + 14.234 + 6 = 243.4...

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