Search found 11 matches

by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:36 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Final 2016 Question 7
Replies: 2
Views: 660

Re: Final 2016 Question 7

To determine cis and trans, you have to look at whether both of the groups are "up" or "down" in terms of the plane of the molecule. For example, in this example, both of the propyl groups are above the hydrogens that are bonded to those carbons, so this is a cis-molecule. I have...
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:45 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: ch15 #51
Replies: 3
Views: 407

Re: ch15 #51

Because the first step is the slow step, the entire reaction mechanism is going to be controlled by this. Your method is used when you have a fast step and then a slow step because there is a bottleneck effect resulting in the buildup of intermediate products which is why the first step is approxima...
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:35 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Geometric Isomers and Alkanes
Replies: 1
Views: 309

Re: Geometric Isomers and Alkanes

Alkanes only have sigma bonds (from the single bond). Sigma bonds can rotate and move so whatever is attached to the carbon is free to do so. Alkenes however have a pi bond. These are not able to move around freely, because the p-orbits can only overlap side by side if they are in the same place so ...
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:48 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Isomers [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 288

Re: Isomers [ENDORSED]

Constitutional isomers are based on different connectivities in a molecular; we may have the molecular formula of a molecule, but it can have different structural formulas. For example, hexane, C6H14, has five different constitutional isomers, including 2-methylpentane and 3-methylpentane. We need t...
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:25 pm
Forum: *Ketones
Topic: Knowing the ketones and other organic compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 517

Knowing the ketones and other organic compounds

Do we have to know the functions for all the ketones and other organic compounds within the organic chemistry textbook, or are they just for example/nomenclature purposes?
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sun Feb 19, 2017 10:02 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Unique rate law Question 15.5(A)
Replies: 1
Views: 348

Unique rate law Question 15.5(A)

[From the equation -(1/b)*(deltaA/deltaT)]
When we are doing question 15.5(a) and finding the rate of consumption, do we have to state rate of consumption and leave it as a positive answer, or can we leave it as a negative rate to show that it is being consumed?
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:58 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Using an inert electrode
Replies: 2
Views: 223

Using an inert electrode

When should we use an inert electrode in our cell diagram? For example, in textbook problems 13 b and c, we have to use platinum in the cell diagrams. Additionally, why does the ion I- come before the solid I2 in 13b?
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:33 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Clarification on Quiz 1 Prep - Question 2
Replies: 2
Views: 305

Clarification on Quiz 1 Prep - Question 2

For the quiz 1 preparation, my TA told us that the answer was 5 kJ. But, if the question is asking for delta U, and it is an isolated system, shouldn't the answer be 0 kJ?

For reference, the question is: if an isolated system contained +5 kJ of energy, after 100 years delta U = ?

Thanks!
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Wed Jan 18, 2017 9:01 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Question about state functions
Replies: 2
Views: 298

Question about state functions

Why and how can internal energy be a state function when it is composed of two path (non-state) functions? (U = q+w)
by Cecile Riviere-Cazaux 2A
Wed Jan 11, 2017 7:30 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7951
Views: 1123842

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Q: What is a chemist's favorite salty food?
A: NaC2H3O2!
(Nacho)

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