Search found 25 matches

by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:41 am
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Where to split molecule [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 393

Re: Where to split molecule [ENDORSED]

A double bond does not always have the qualifications needed to identify it as cis or trans. There must be a difference in the substituents in order for the classification. For example, in the left image, since both of the substituents with the higher atomic number are on the same side of the double...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:26 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Chemistry Joke :)
ether_you_get_ochem_mug.jpg
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:21 am
Forum: *Cyclopropanes and Cyclobutanes
Topic: Conformations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 786

Re: Conformations [ENDORSED]

We need to understand which conformation represents which cycloalkane. For example, for cyclopropane, there is only one conformation being cyclopropane where all C's are on the same plane. For cyclobutane, the most stable conformation is the butterfly. For cyclopentane, the most stable conformation ...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:01 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Chemistry Joke:)
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by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 07, 2017 9:29 am
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: Determining the Dominance between a Cycloalkane and a Long Carbon Chain
Replies: 3
Views: 416

Re: Determining the Dominance between a Cycloalkane and a Long Carbon Chain

The name for the first line structure you posted would be 1-cyclohexyl-11-methylundecane. This is because there are 11 carbons on the main chain of carbons, meaning the prefix is undec- and then -ane because there are only single carbon-carbon bonds. Then to name the substituents, you first look at ...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Mar 07, 2017 9:08 am
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Transition states
Replies: 3
Views: 267

Re: Transition states

In the electrophilic addition reaction there are two transition states since there are two steps. Each step correlates with a differing transition state. In the first transition state, the double bond breaks between two carbons, and the electrophile (ex.H-Br) attaches through a tentative bond with t...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:32 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Chemistry Joke :)
organic chem.jpg
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:24 pm
Forum: *Electrophilic Addition
Topic: Electrophile Addition vs. SN2 Reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 664

Re: Electrophile Addition vs. SN2 Reaction

Another main difference between electrophilic addition and the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction is that they have two steps and one step, respectively. The electrophilic addition reaction has two steps meaning two transition states, while the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution react...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:13 pm
Forum: *Electrophilic Addition
Topic: nucleophile and electrophile reactions
Replies: 6
Views: 875

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

When drawing organic reactions, it is pertinent to use curved arrows in order to represent the electron movement from an e- rich region to a deficient region. In other words, the arrow represents the movement of electrons from a nucleophile to an electrophile. The nucleophile of a reaction is usuall...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:02 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Chemistry Joke :)
IMG_7674.JPG
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:57 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: General Question about Nucleophiles vs. Electrophiles
Replies: 2
Views: 668

Re: General Question about Nucleophiles vs. Electrophiles

In order to differentiate if a neutral molecule is a nucleophile or electrophile we must pay attention to the central atom. If the central atom has a electronegativity of delta negative, this means it is electron rich and a nucleophile, and it has free electrons or a pi bond that could be broken to ...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:47 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Electrophile/Nucleophile
Replies: 3
Views: 427

Re: Electrophile/Nucleophile

From my understanding, when identifying an atom as a nucleophile, an atom that donates an electron pair to a electrophile due to free electrons or a pi bond, we must pay attention to the electronegativity, therefore we can distinguish the delta negative atom from the delta positive atom. As mentione...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 19, 2017 6:14 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Chemistry Joke :)

nz069.jpg
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 19, 2017 3:59 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Homework Question
Replies: 4
Views: 472

Re: Homework Question

Hi! For this question, I'm confused as to why we don't square H 2 when it asks for the reaction rate with doubling the concentration of H 2 . Doesn't the equation for the rate law involve k[H 2 ] a , in which a= the coefficient, which would be 2 since we doubled it? Or am I mixing up concepts? Than...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 19, 2017 3:49 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Know Which Order It Is [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 349

Re: Know Which Order It Is [ENDORSED]

As well as this, another thing to consider is the overall order of the reaction. Depending on the amount of reactants, aA+bB=cC+dD, you must find the order of each reactant, then add the sum of the orders to get the OVERALL order. For example, let's say rate law =k[A]^2 * [B]^2, then the overall ord...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 12, 2017 2:19 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 883170

Electrochemistry Joke :)

tumblr_m3kf6uVffK1qde7nao1_1280.png
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 12, 2017 2:07 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: E and E°, G and G°
Replies: 3
Views: 457

Re: E and E°, G and G°

E Cell and E Cell°are different in that E Cell°is the standard cell potential, while E Cell merely represents the cell potential. The Standard Cell Potential is measured when all species taking part are in their standard states. You use the standard cell potentials given for half equations to figure...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:43 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Creating Cell Diagrams
Replies: 2
Views: 351

Re: Creating Cell Diagrams

From my understanding, when writing a cell diagram, you leave out all moles and just focus on the molecules given. For example, if you find the final reaction to be 2Ni(OH)^3(s)+Cd(s)-->Cd(OH)^2(s)+2Ni(OH)^2(s) then the cell diagram is Cd(s),Cd(OH)^2(s)|KOH(aq)||Ni(OH)^3(s),Ni(OH)^2(s), Ni(s) All mo...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 05, 2017 2:39 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Irreversible vs reversible pathway
Replies: 2
Views: 402

Re: Irreversible vs reversible pathway

If we know that all real processes are irreversible, then how do we know when to use w = -nRT ln V1/V2 instead of w = -P∆V and vice versa? For calculating entropy, do we never use w = -P∆V because it has to be a reversible expansion and isothermal? The equations given will usually specify whether t...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Feb 05, 2017 2:31 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Trouton's rule
Replies: 4
Views: 535

Re: Trouton's rule

Even though we aren't required to know this, does anyone understand the concept? Can someone please explain it? Thank you.
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Jan 31, 2017 9:20 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Change Formula
Replies: 2
Views: 400

Re: Phase Change Formula

An adiabatic system means that all heat within the system remains, so there is no transfer from the adiabatic system to it's surroundings. Concerning the melting of ice, you must use the H(fusion) (kj/mol) and multiply that by moles. If given grams, you divide by the molar mass of water. This way al...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:33 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Q 8.53
Replies: 1
Views: 262

Re: Q 8.53

In the equation, it asks you to calculate the internal energy for the reaction of one mole . Therefore, when you are given 1.40 grams of carbon monoxide, you must convert the grams to moles. Then from here, you take the total heat in kj, and divide by moles. Therefore you're final answer is in kj/mo...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Sun Jan 22, 2017 3:05 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Can some explain reversible and irreversible processes? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 350

Re: Can some explain reversible and irreversible processes? [ENDORSED]

An irreversible process takes less work than a isothermal, reversible process. For an irreversible process, when you graph pressure against volume, you find that the pressure is constant, and the volume fluctuates. This would make a straight line horizontally, resulting in a square-shaped curve, and...
by Desiree Martin 2A
Tue Jan 10, 2017 9:04 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Burns Worse from Steam Than Water Example
Replies: 2
Views: 437

Re: Burns Worse from Steam Than Water Example

It is important to understand this conceptually. In the example, it is asking you to compare a steam burn to a water burn. When we look at the water burn, if the water is 100 degrees and it reaches 30 degrees, then the amount of heat being released is about 5 kJ, and this is significantly less becau...

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