Search found 11 matches

by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:55 pm
Forum: *Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes (Staggered, Eclipsed, Gauche, Anti, Newman Projections)
Topic: How to tell whether a molecule is eclipsed or staggered by looking at the 2D repersentation?
Replies: 4
Views: 3380

Re: How to tell whether a molecule is eclipsed or staggered by looking at the 2D repersentation?

To add on to this, you can tell mostly because the Newman projection gives you the 2-D image looking along the C-C bond - think of it as facing C1 head-on so that C2 is perfectly behind it. Staggered and eclipsed just refer to the positions of the hydrogens in this radial image - staggered means th...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Thu Mar 16, 2017 5:09 pm
Forum: *Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes (Staggered, Eclipsed, Gauche, Anti, Newman Projections)
Topic: How to tell whether a molecule is eclipsed or staggered by looking at the 2D repersentation?
Replies: 4
Views: 3380

Re: How to tell whether a molecule is eclipsed or staggered by looking at the 2D repersentation?

So if you're looking at a Newman Projection of Ethane, the dihedral angle or simply just the angle between the hydrogens on C1 compared to the hydrogens on C2 will tell, visually, what conformation the Ethane molecule is in. If the hydrogens between both carbons are eclipsing each other from a two-d...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Mar 12, 2017 11:19 pm
Forum: *Alcohols
Topic: Pg. 101 in the course reader
Replies: 1
Views: 599

Re: Pg. 101 in the course reader

In this case you're still counting the longest carbon chain which is 4 carbons and it's called 4-Chloro-2-Butanol because the functional group appears on the 2nd carbon in the chain. The functional group is going to take priority over the halogen so the smallest possible number in relation to the ca...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Mar 05, 2017 11:56 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkenes
Topic: Naming: IUPAC & Common Naming
Replies: 2
Views: 475

Naming: IUPAC & Common Naming

In Friday's lecture we covered a cycloalkane that had a substituent on its first carbon and we called this substituent Butyl. The longest carbon chain in that substituent, although, had only three carbons which would make it propyl. I understand that it is called butyl because of common naming but w...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:47 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: cations
Replies: 1
Views: 285

Re: cations

I believe not all cations are considered electrophiles because, while electrophiles are electron deficient and attracted to electrons, compounds such as BH3, for example, are not considered cations but they have lone pairs to donate and are electron deficient meaning that they will accept nucleophil...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Feb 19, 2017 11:23 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Ways to Approach Proposed Reaction Mechanisms
Replies: 2
Views: 331

Re: Ways to Approach Proposed Reaction Mechanisms

In lecture on Friday Lavelle told us we could use either approach but the pre-equilibrium approach is much simpler than the steady-state approach. We can use either approach exclusively but the pre-equilibrium method is apparently less tedious because, if done correctly, either approach will always ...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sat Feb 11, 2017 6:27 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Past Midterm: 2015 Q6 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 286

Past Midterm: 2015 Q6 [ENDORSED]

This question gives you half reactions at 25ºC and you use them to find Eº(cell) which ends up being +0.82 V. The last part of the question asks you to find K and, in the course reader, K is found through the equation ∆Gº= -RT(ln(K)) in which I understand how to use this to find K but why couldn't I...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Feb 05, 2017 6:33 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation and Reduction
Replies: 3
Views: 467

Re: Oxidation and Reduction

The charge on the Cr is 6+ because we account for only one Chromium ion here and when we look at the reduction on the other side which I believe in that question ended up with Cr3+ so we would say that it reduced from Cr6+ to Cr3+ because we're only considering the one Cr ion on the left side. The r...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Jan 29, 2017 7:44 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: 9.13
Replies: 1
Views: 335

Re: 9.13

This is most likely because, although volume is changing, the question says the change is happening irreversibly so we would assume pressure to be constant. If the change were to be reversible, then changes in pressure would need to be taken into account.
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sat Jan 21, 2017 11:32 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible vs irreversible process
Replies: 2
Views: 418

Re: Reversible vs irreversible process

Building off of what Melanie said, if you were to theoretically be in a state of equilibrium between the pressure of a gas in a system with that of the external pressure. An infinitesimally small change in external pressure will change the the pressure in the inside in such a way that it can literal...
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
Sun Jan 15, 2017 1:59 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Calculating Standard Enthalpy of Reaction
Replies: 1
Views: 342

Re: Calculating Standard Enthalpy of Reaction

When you're trying to find the changes in enthalpies between phase changes it does not only apply to solids. I believe that in the case you're talking about, they're only accounting for the phase change associated with solids, but if you were to be calculating change in enthalpy from a gas to a soli...

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