Search found 10 matches

by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Mar 19, 2017 11:30 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Chem 14C
Replies: 3
Views: 592

Re: Chem 14C

Do you know if the Organic Chemistry Course Reader we got for Chem 14B can be used for Chem 14C? Like, are there topics in our current Organics Course Reader that are covered in chem 14C?
by andrea_Disc3D
Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:41 pm
Forum: *Nucleophilic Substitution
Topic: SN1 and SN2
Replies: 2
Views: 644

Re: SN1 and SN2

The 1 and 2 in SN1 and SN2 refer to the molecularity, right? Like SN2 = bimolecular. But what exactly does bimolecular mean? Does it have to do with there being 2 different reactants or 2 moles of reactants?
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Mar 12, 2017 10:01 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Numbering
Replies: 6
Views: 497

Re: Numbering

I heard someone say that you should also number a molecule so that you have the most substituents. I was wondering if anyone knew whether this was true or not?
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:10 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Quiz 3 Winter 2017
Replies: 183
Views: 15877

Re: Quiz 3 Winter 2017

Can someone explain to me why CH3OCH3 is a nucleophile? My TA said that we should look at the center atom when determining whether a molecule is a nucleophike or electrophile. Assuming that oxygen is the central atom (?). Carbon is more electronegative than oxygen so the electrons are attracted mor...
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Mar 05, 2017 6:46 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Quiz 3 Winter 2017
Replies: 183
Views: 15877

Re: Quiz 3 Winter 2017

Can someone explain to me why CH3OCH3 is a nucleophile? My TA said that we should look at the center atom when determining whether a molecule is a nucleophike or electrophile. Assuming that oxygen is the central atom (?). Carbon is more electronegative than oxygen so the electrons are attracted more...
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:22 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: How is H2O a nucleophile?
Replies: 2
Views: 486

Re: How is H2O a nucleophile?

Correct me if I'm wrong.
But I think it's because nucleophiles "donate" electrons and therefore tend to be species that have a negative charge or extra electrons. Oxygen in H2O has 2 lone pairs of electrons which are readily donated.
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 am
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: 14.33
Replies: 3
Views: 374

Re: 14.33

When the question asks to identify whether Tl^+ will disproportionate in an aqueous solution, the answer is no because Gibss free energy is positive (Given: +215kj/mol) and not spontaneous, but also K <1, right? Is this a right reasoning? I know that there is also an equation that related Gibbs Free...
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Feb 05, 2017 3:53 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Acidic vs. Basic Solution
Replies: 2
Views: 263

Re: Acidic vs. Basic Solution

What is the main difference between balancing an acidic and basic solution? Would we still need to add H2O to balance out the half reactions in a basic solution like we do in an acidic solution?
by andrea_Disc3D
Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:08 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Ch 9 #1c Why does Entropy decrease when temperature increases?
Replies: 1
Views: 224

Ch 9 #1c Why does Entropy decrease when temperature increases?

The question asks what happens to the entropy generated by your body heat when the temperature of the room increases from 20 degrees Celsius to 30 degrees Celsius. I understand mathematically why entropy decreases because the denominator (Temperature) in the entropy equation deltaS=q/t increases and...
by andrea_Disc3D
Sun Jan 15, 2017 4:52 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Chapter 8 #65
Replies: 5
Views: 582

Re: Chapter 8 #65

How would you have known to half the second equation ? You know you have to half the second equation because in order to form dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) you need 2NO which the first equation gives you. But the first equation also produces 2NO2 which you do not want in your final reaction equation....

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