Search found 24 matches

by Marisa_Woo_2G
Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:58 pm
Forum: *Cyclohexanes (Chair, Boat, Geometric Isomers)
Topic: Equatorial Bond Angle
Replies: 1
Views: 301

Equatorial Bond Angle

Hi everyone!

I was wondering if someone could clarify the equatorial bond angle on cyclohexane. Is the equatorial bond angle not 90 degrees because the carbon has bond angles of 109.5 degrees or is this due to other reasons like electrostatics?

Thanks so much!
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sun Mar 12, 2017 5:47 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019373

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

If a bear in Yosemite and a bear in Alaska both fall into the water, which one dissolves faster?

The one in Alaska, because it's polar. :)

~~~~
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate. :)
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sun Mar 05, 2017 10:45 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019373

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

What do you call a tooth in a glass of water?

A one molar solution :)
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sun Mar 05, 2017 10:33 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Naming
Replies: 1
Views: 271

Re: Naming

I think Dr. Lavelle had mentioned that the question will either specify to name the compound (in which you may choose to name it with iupac or common naming) or it will specify to name the compound with iupac naming.
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Thu Feb 23, 2017 11:56 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Molecularity and Overall Rate Law Relationship [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 428

Molecularity and Overall Rate Law Relationship [ENDORSED]

Hi all! I was wondering if someone could explain to me the relationship between molecularity and the overall rate law. Is it that a unimolecular reaction would translate to a first-order reaction? Or is this different as there may be intermediates in the actual reaction that affect the molecularity ...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:40 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Pre-equilibrium approach and steady-state approach
Replies: 3
Views: 1064

Re: Pre-equilibrium approach and steady-state approach

To my understanding, the steady-state approximation is when you determine if the concentration of the intermediate product/reactant is constant in the rate limiting slow step. If the proposed mechanism is correct, the intermediate that is formed and used is in a low amount and therefore constant dur...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:14 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagram Conventions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 828

Re: Cell Diagram Conventions [ENDORSED]

I believe that generally the format is to put "Electrode- Anode (Solid) I Aqueous solution- Anode (aq) II Aqueous solution- Cathode (aq) I Electrode- Cathode (Solid)". The comma refers to if the redox reaction does not have a solid that can be used as an electrode. In this case, platinum m...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:21 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Galvanic Cell Diagram Contents [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 288

Galvanic Cell Diagram Contents [ENDORSED]

Hi everyone! I just wanted to clarify the contents of a copper-zinc battery as from the course reader. I know Dr. Lavelle said that the electrodes were made out of Zinc and Copper, but what is the solution that the electrodes are in? Is it Zn 2+ and Copper 2+ respectively since this is where the ele...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Jan 27, 2017 4:50 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs Free Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 212

Re: Gibbs Free Energy

Gibbs free energy is the available energy from a reaction that can be used for work. When you have a large negative change in Gibbs free energy, the reaction is spontaneous/more favorable and will move in a forward direction. One can predict spontaneity with this value. The change in Gibbs free ener...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sat Jan 21, 2017 5:32 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Degeneracy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 297

Re: Degeneracy [ENDORSED]

Degeneracy (W) is the number of ways of achieving a given energy state, or the number of different ways a particle can be in a different position, but still have the same energy. This means that states would exist with the same energy, but with per say different structure. I believe that if there is...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Jan 13, 2017 7:16 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Problem 8.65
Replies: 3
Views: 268

Re: Problem 8.65

Hi! To my understanding, I solved this problem with Hess's law for the first part and then the method #3 with the standard heats of formation. First, I set up the final chemical equation we are trying to find, the formation of dinitrogen pentaoxide: The final equation is: N 2 (g) + 5/2 O 2 (g) --> N...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Dec 02, 2016 7:24 pm
Forum: *Titrations & Titration Calculations
Topic: titration types
Replies: 1
Views: 250

Re: titration types

You could technically do a titration for a weak acid and a weak base; however, this would be very difficult as both acids and bases would change the overall pH of the solution. You would not be able to differentiate between the two. In a tritration, you are able to choose the titrant to add to the u...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:43 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining Weak or Strong Bases/Acids
Replies: 4
Views: 680

Re: Determining Weak or Strong Bases/Acids

To add on, most organic acids and bases (with carbon) are generally weak acids and bases.
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:09 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Concentration Units [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 733

Equilibrium Concentration Units [ENDORSED]

Hi all!

I was wondering what units we would use when we calculate an equilibrium concentration? Would it be molarity or would it have no units like the equilibrium constant?

Thanks!
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:24 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Equilibrium Constant vs Reaction Quotient [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 852

Re: Equilibrium Constant vs Reaction Quotient [ENDORSED]

Just to clarify, the values used to calculate K and Q should be concentrations? Would this refer to molar concentrations like moles/liter and molarity for aqueous solutions? And then partial pressure for concentrations of gas?
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:50 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Anti-Bonding Orbitals Definition
Replies: 1
Views: 253

Anti-Bonding Orbitals Definition

Hi all!

I was wondering if someone could give me a definition of anti-bonding orbitals? Does this just refer to the energy levels in the molecular orbital theory?

Thanks in advance!
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Nov 04, 2016 3:52 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Cation vs Anion
Replies: 4
Views: 699

Re: Cation vs Anion

A cation is an atom with its outermost electron(s) removed, while an anion is an atom with outermost electron(s) added. This is important because atoms generally want to become more stable and have the full electron configuration of a noble gas. Cations tend to be elements on the left-hand side of t...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Thu Nov 03, 2016 9:28 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019373

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

What do you get when you cut an avocado into 6.02214x1023 pieces?

Guacamole! :)
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Oct 28, 2016 3:23 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Covalent and Ionic Character
Replies: 5
Views: 7556

Covalent and Ionic Character

HI!

I just wanted to clarify how to determine covalent and ionic character. If the compound is between a non-metal and non-metal, is the character more covalent? And if the compound is between a metal and non-metal, is the character more ionic?

Thanks so much!
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:36 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019373

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

The optimist sees the glass half full. The pessimist sees the glass half empty. The chemist sees the glass completely full, half with liquid and half with air. :)
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:21 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 6
Views: 619

Re: Electron Affinity

More or less, the two equations refer to the same concept. "X" refers to a generic element (Element X: Cl, O, N, etc.) so the first equation would essentially be: Generic element in a gas-phase + added electrons --> Generic element in a gas phase with a negative charge The other equation r...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Thu Oct 13, 2016 3:03 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 6
Views: 619

Re: Electron Affinity

Furthermore, a higher electron affinity would mean that the element would like to pick up electrons to become more stable. If the element's electron configuration is more stable, there would be a lower electron affinity. You can see this in the equation for electron affinity: Electron affinity = Ene...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Fri Oct 07, 2016 6:07 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Emittance versus Absorption in Atomic Spectra [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 292

Emittance versus Absorption in Atomic Spectra [ENDORSED]

Hi everyone! I was a little confused on the impact of emittance versus absorption when an electron begins or returns to a certain energy level. What does it mean for an electron to return to the given n-value for a certain atomic spectra series? For example, would a Balmer series electron return or ...
by Marisa_Woo_2G
Thu Sep 29, 2016 5:58 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Steps for Limiting Reactant Problems
Replies: 4
Views: 846

Re: Steps for Limiting Reactant Problems

Looks great! I would just add that these are the steps if the question asked you to find the limiting reactant. If the question asked for the theoretical yield (how much product forms if the reaction occurs perfectly), you would multiply the moles of the limiting reactant by the molar ratio from the...

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