Search found 26 matches

by Allison Suzuki 2B
Fri Mar 17, 2017 5:37 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: 2015 Final Q9A
Replies: 1
Views: 695

Re: 2015 Final Q9A

The main carbon chain is a propane because there is an -OH functional group attached to the second carbon, so the ending will be propanol. The 3 carbons are numbered from right to left, so the cyclohexyl is attached to the first carbon, and the methyl is attached to the second carbon. The cyclohexyl...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:27 pm
Forum: *Alcohols
Topic: Functional Groups [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 689

Re: Functional Groups [ENDORSED]

I believe my TA told us that we will only have to deal with one functional group as a substituent!
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Mar 12, 2017 10:16 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkenes
Topic: Multiple double or triple bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 645

Re: Multiple double or triple bonds

Hi Chelsey!! I don't think you have to put a prefix indicating the amount of double or triple bonds that are present in a cyclo-alkene/alkyne; the numbering in front of the name should be enough to indicate the position and amount of double or triple bonds involved in the molecule. Actually, a pref...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:51 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Iso and Neo Prefixes
Replies: 5
Views: 697

Re: Iso and Neo Prefixes

The prefixes 'iso-' and 'neo-' are used for common naming instead of IUPAC naming; 'iso-' being used when there are 4 or less carbons, and 'neo-' when there are five or more. Common naming doesn't follow the rule of numbering the longest carbon chain, but instead counts all of the carbons. Using com...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Mar 01, 2017 7:40 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Naming
Replies: 2
Views: 425

Re: Naming

Lone pairs should be included in hybridization, because they are included in the number of regions of electron density.
However, I think that you don't need to mention them when naming the shape, although it does alter the structure of the molecules.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sat Feb 25, 2017 12:53 am
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Nucleophiles and Electrophiles
Replies: 2
Views: 396

Re: Nucleophiles and Electrophiles

Nucleophiles are negatively charged and donate electrons, while electrophiles are positively charged and are attracted to electrons.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Feb 19, 2017 12:17 am
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Kinetics Quiz
Replies: 1
Views: 364

Re: Kinetics Quiz

Dr. Lavelle mentioned in a post that the quiz will only cover up to pg. 73, so there shouldn't be any problems about the material after that!
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:00 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Cell Diagrams
Replies: 1
Views: 299

Re: Cell Diagrams

I think you'll always include H+ and OH- in the cell diagrams because they contribute to the overall charge, but since H2O has no charge it is not included.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:19 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Balancing Equations/When To Use Integers and When Not To?
Replies: 3
Views: 423

Re: Balancing Equations/When To Use Integers and When Not To?

Usually, the only time we have really needed to use fractions for balancing equations is if we are calculating the standard enthalpy of formation; that is just so the manipulated equations will look like the final. Besides that, we will balance equations with integers.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:29 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Quiz 1
Replies: 11
Views: 1117

Re: Quiz 1

The quiz will cover chapters 8, 9, and part of 11.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Jan 25, 2017 9:26 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 8.67
Replies: 1
Views: 271

Re: 8.67

The problem I think you're referring to is #73a, but you are looking at the answer to #73b? The easiest way to approach these problems is to draw out the molecular structures, then you can compare the differences between the reactants and the products. For this problem, there will be 3 carbon-carbon...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:45 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Chapter 8, Problem 61
Replies: 5
Views: 738

Re: Chapter 8, Problem 61

You only have to reverse the equation so the molecules will match the final equation. For example, since you were left with HBr on the reactants side of the equation, you would reverse the equation so that HBr will be on the product side.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Tue Jan 17, 2017 10:01 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Problem 8.57 (Hess's Law)
Replies: 2
Views: 404

Re: Problem 8.57 (Hess's Law)

Also, the reason why the solutions have some of the coefficients as fractions is so that the equations, when added together, match the appearance of the final equation that is given.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Jan 15, 2017 2:28 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Tips/ Tricks for those New to Chemistry Community
Replies: 4
Views: 920

Re: Tips/ Tricks for those New to Chemistry Community

If you scroll a little bit down when you're asking/answering a question, there is a box that says "attachments", and you can upload a picture there or drag the file into the message box! Hope this helps
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Nov 30, 2016 12:49 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 3
Views: 748

Re: Sig Figs

Usually for my calculations I include about 4-5 places after the decimal for each step, then for the final answer round to however many significant figures the problem calls for.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Nov 30, 2016 12:46 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 11.117
Replies: 2
Views: 371

Re: 11.117

In the problem, you're given two values: 0.245 mol SO 3 and 0.240 mol SO 2 . The volume is 1.00 L, so your concentration will be of the same values. When you create your ICE table, the reaction initially starts off with none of the product (SO 2 ), and ends up with 0.240, you can conclude that the c...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Nov 27, 2016 4:31 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Problem 11. 87
Replies: 1
Views: 326

Re: Problem 11. 87

You know the reaction is endothermic because between the first and second image, it appears that several of the molecules have broken apart. This means that heat must have been added to the container, thus breaking the chemical bonds of the molecules. And when heat is added, that reaction is endothe...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:27 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 286

Re: Naming Compounds

The only compounds that should end in -ate are the ones that have a negative charge. So if a compound looks like [xx]2-, it will have the suffix -ate.

Hope this helps!
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:56 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Naming Ligands
Replies: 5
Views: 870

Re: Naming Ligands

They're exactly the same compounds, just the ones ending in -ido are from the new IUPAC naming.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sun Nov 13, 2016 1:04 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Trans and Cis
Replies: 3
Views: 505

Re: Trans and Cis

Trans and cis molecules are isomers, meaning that they have the same molecular formula, and the basic difference between these molecules is the placement of its atoms. Also, trans molecules are non-polar while cis molecules are polar.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Fri Nov 04, 2016 7:55 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization for expanded octets
Replies: 3
Views: 928

Re: Hybridization for expanded octets

I think it should actually be written as dsp3, but other than that your answer is correct.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Wed Oct 26, 2016 5:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: CH3 HW questions
Replies: 3
Views: 477

Re: CH3 HW questions

So for #57c, by having three double bonds, the formal charge for the molecule is 0. If there were two double bonds, the overall charge on the molecule would be +2. Having more double bonds just reduces the formal charge of the molecule, since you want to be as close to 0 as possible. For #99, the re...
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Fri Oct 21, 2016 7:22 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Question 2.19 in textbook
Replies: 1
Views: 298

Re: Question 2.19 in textbook

You only need to take the d into consideration when determining the number of orbitals, which in this case, is 5.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Fri Oct 14, 2016 11:08 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Addition and subtraction of significant figures with scientific notation?
Replies: 4
Views: 952

Re: Addition and subtraction of significant figures with scientific notation?

When using significant figures during addition and subtraction, you have to round to the decimal place of the least accurate number.
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sat Oct 08, 2016 6:04 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: 2015 Quiz 1 Preparation Problem 5 from Workbook [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 369

Re: 2015 Quiz 1 Preparation Problem 5 from Workbook [ENDORSED]

You did all of the work correctly, but just multiplied by the wrong factor to get the molecular formula. You said you ended up with C=1, H=2.38, and O=1, but you should round 2.38 up to 2.4 so when you multiply everything by 5, you should get C5H12O5. If you check the molar mass, it equals 152.15
by Allison Suzuki 2B
Sat Oct 01, 2016 4:33 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Is there a sig fig resource in the textbook? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 491

Re: Is there a sig fig resource in the textbook? [ENDORSED]

There are two areas in the textbook that have some useful information on sig figs. In the front of the book pg. F10 has the definition and some examples, and the appendix in the back (A5) has some more detail on significant figures!

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