Search found 17 matches

by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Fri Mar 17, 2017 4:53 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Q4 2013 Practice Final
Replies: 2
Views: 389

Re: Q4 2013 Practice Final

Thank you! It all makes sense now.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:41 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Q4 2013 Practice Final
Replies: 2
Views: 389

Q4 2013 Practice Final

In question 4 of the winter 2013 Practice Final, how do you calculate the number of moles, n?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:21 am
Forum: *Nucleophilic Substitution
Topic: Bimolecular Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction
Replies: 3
Views: 775

Re: Bimolecular Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction

Do bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions occur only in one step?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Mar 05, 2017 4:07 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Alkane nomenclature after decane
Replies: 1
Views: 272

Re: Alkane nomenclature after decane

No, I believe he told us in lecture to memorize the first ten.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:49 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: nucleophiles
Replies: 2
Views: 372

Re: nucleophiles

Yes! All nucleophiles are positive-charge loving, so they are all lewis bases with a negative charge.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Feb 19, 2017 11:37 pm
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: Is there such a thing as a Third Order Reaction?
Replies: 5
Views: 1002

Re: Is there such a thing as a Third Order Reaction?

Yes, third order and fourth order reactions do exist. But in most chemistry classes the main focus is on first, second, and third order reactions.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:06 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: reaction order
Replies: 3
Views: 538

Re: reaction order

There are many ways to determine whether a reaction is zero, first, or second order such as by looking at graphs or tables. Generally, the rate of the reaction of a zero order reaction is independent of the concentration of the reactants, Rate=k[A]^0=k. For a first order, the rate of the reaction is...
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:06 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Electrode
Replies: 1
Views: 282

Electrode

How do you identify whether a voltaic cell needs an inert conductor?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:04 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Bond Enthalpies
Replies: 2
Views: 342

Bond Enthalpies

In a bond enthalpy problem, when you determine which bonds are being broken and which ones are being formed, how do you calculate the delta H of the reaction? Is it the sum of delta H products minus the sum of delta H reactants or do you simply add the sum of the bonds broken and the sum of the bond...
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:22 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Work
Replies: 1
Views: 323

Work

If the height of the mass in the surroundings is lowered, work, w, is positive; if the height is raised, w is negative. Why is this false?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Jan 22, 2017 9:37 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Example 8.15
Replies: 1
Views: 354

Re: Example 8.15

Did you mean to ask why does delta U=q? I was looking at the question and it doesn't ask anything about delta H being equal to q. Anyway, delta U is equal to q only when w is equal to 0.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sun Jan 15, 2017 5:20 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Chapter 8 Number 19
Replies: 2
Views: 337

Re: Chapter 8 Number 19

What you calculated was only the first part that raises the temperature of the copper, so the second part was added to take into account the heat needed to raise the temperature of the water. When calculating heat change, you need to take into account both the metal and water.
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sat Dec 03, 2016 12:02 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar vs. Nonpolar
Replies: 1
Views: 338

Polar vs. Nonpolar

Why is xenon difluoride nonpolar? Why is bromine trifluoride nonpolar and trigonal planar while chlorine trifluoride is polar and t-shaped(as illustrated on page 118 figure 4.7 in the textbook)? These two molecules have two lone pairs and three bonded fluorines, so why do they have different molecul...
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Sat Nov 12, 2016 11:30 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Anionic Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 348

Anionic Ligands

What's the difference between nitro and nitrito?
What's the difference between isocyanato and thiocyanate?
How do these ligands function when bonding?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Fri Nov 04, 2016 11:41 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Molecular Orbital Theory
Replies: 4
Views: 518

Molecular Orbital Theory

What is an anti bonding molecular orbital and how does it relate to the molecular orbital theory?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Fri Oct 28, 2016 5:38 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Spherical Polar Coordinates
Replies: 1
Views: 332

Spherical Polar Coordinates

What is the purpose of spherical polar coordinates and how do they relate to the wave function?
by Gisselle Cervantes 2G
Fri Sep 30, 2016 6:59 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: CHEM JOKES
Replies: 29
Views: 4162

CHEM JOKES

Do you want to hear a joke?
Yttrium, Oxygen, Uranium
YOU!

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