Search found 13 matches

by Molly Laviano 3N
Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:54 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: Cyclohexane Chair Conformation with Substituents
Replies: 2
Views: 580

Re: Cyclohexane Chair Conformation with Substituents

Yes, I understand that the larger molecules prefer the equatorial position. My question was more directed at the location in the conformation (in terms of which carbon atom the substituents bond to). In the chair conformation, would a propyl group be more stable at "head" of the chair, or ...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Sat Mar 18, 2017 7:09 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: Cyclohexane Chair Conformation with Substituents
Replies: 2
Views: 580

Cyclohexane Chair Conformation with Substituents

If we are told to draw the most stable conformation of a cyclohexane molecule with multiple substituents, does the numbering of carbons (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) and the placement of the substituents matter? For example, If there is a methyl group, an ethyl group, and a propyl group, is the propyl group mo...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:22 am
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Winter 2016 Final, 4B [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 257

Winter 2016 Final, 4B [ENDORSED]

Part B of question 4 asks us to determine which proposed reaction mechanisms are valid and which step within the mechanism is the slow, rate-limiting step. My questions... We cannot have an intermediate in our rate law, correct? To get rid of an intermediate, do we use the equation for the equilibri...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Sun Mar 05, 2017 5:38 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Collision Orientation
Replies: 1
Views: 241

Collision Orientation

Given that molecules must collide in a certain way for a reaction to occur, how do we identify the specific orientation of a bimolecular collision?
by Molly Laviano 3N
Fri Mar 03, 2017 2:28 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: H2O as a nucleophile
Replies: 3
Views: 354

Re: H2O as a nucleophile

Makes senses, thank you!!
by Molly Laviano 3N
Thu Mar 02, 2017 10:01 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Alkanes
Replies: 1
Views: 281

Re: Alkanes

For alkanes with the general molecular formula: C(n)H(2n+2), Once a molecule has four or more carbons, there is not a set lewis structure. Therefore, even if we know the molecular formula, we do not necessarily know the structure. However, cycloalkanes have the molecular formula: C(n)H(2n) With this...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:51 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: Ambident
Replies: 3
Views: 410

Re: Ambident

You can tell whether or not a molecule is ambident by looking at the lone pairs; an ambident nucleophile has lone pairs available on multiple atoms.

i.e. Thiocyanate (SCN-) has lone pairs available on both Sulfur and Nitrogen
by Molly Laviano 3N
Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:43 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: H2O as a nucleophile
Replies: 3
Views: 354

H2O as a nucleophile

Hello!

Quick question: Why is H2O a nucleophile?
by Molly Laviano 3N
Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:46 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: 2 step reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 246

Re: 2 step reactions

You should be given more information within the problem on which elementary step is slower. Just by looking at the individual steps, you do not have enough information to determine the slower step. For example, if you are given the rate law, you can determine which elementary step defines the rate l...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:37 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Order Reactions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 397

Re: Order Reactions [ENDORSED]

The order of a reaction describes the relationship between the concentration of a species and the rate of a reaction. By examining the overall order and the individual orders of the components of a reaction, we can see which concentrations influence the rate of the reaction. We are able to see if th...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:39 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Formulas
Replies: 3
Views: 460

Formulas

Hello!

There are many different formulas between chapters 8 and 9, and I am confused specifically as to when we use each one.

Would someone be willing to outline the various formulas and the circumstances for which they are applicable?
by Molly Laviano 3N
Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:00 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: 9.43 on finding the final temperature when it is not given
Replies: 2
Views: 428

Re: 9.43 on finding the final temperature when it is not given

This equation comes from the formulas to solve for enthalpy. At a constant pressure (which we have in this problem), we can use the equation q=(n)(Cp)(DeltaT) to solve for enthalpy. We know that the two water samples will release/absorb heat at an equal rate. Allowing q(h) to denote the enthalpy of ...
by Molly Laviano 3N
Fri Jan 13, 2017 10:10 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated Systems [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 529

Re: Isolated Systems [ENDORSED]

While an argument could, in theory, be made to say that a high quality thermos is a closed system, we ultimately would choose to consider to be an isolated system because the insulation of the thermos captures the heat to a fairly strong degree. Therefore, very minimal heat, if any, is lost from the...

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