Search found 18 matches

by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:54 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7578
Views: 1012549

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

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by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:01 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7578
Views: 1012549

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

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by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:01 pm
Forum: *Organic Reaction Mechanisms in General
Topic: Sign of the Gibbs for a reaction profile
Replies: 3
Views: 395

Re: Sign of the Gibbs for a reaction profile

In this case we were given a specific example of the reaction HBr and Propene which is defined to have products that are in lower energy than reactants. For now the organic textbook only went through three examples for each type of reaction (electrophilic addition, aromatic substitution, and the SN2...
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:50 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7578
Views: 1012549

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Since organics is coming up
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Feb 19, 2017 3:43 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Chapter 15 question 19
Replies: 2
Views: 318

Re: Chapter 15 question 19

You can also look at experiments 2 and 3 to calculate the order for B.
If you calculate for the coefficient m below, it should equal to 2.
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Feb 12, 2017 2:47 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Winter Midterm 2015 Q4,5 D
Replies: 1
Views: 220

Winter Midterm 2015 Q4,5 D

I noticed that there is a three step calculation for the entropy - I understand why the first and second steps are there, but why is it necessary to include the third step in which the temperature goes back to room temperature?
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:16 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Standard Hydrogen Electrode
Replies: 1
Views: 210

Standard Hydrogen Electrode

Just to confirm, the standard hydrogen electrode is used as a reference to measure the reduction potentials of other elements?
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Jan 22, 2017 4:09 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Chemistry Joke
Replies: 28
Views: 2817

Re: Chemistry Joke

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by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sat Dec 03, 2016 11:32 pm
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Significant Figures for pH
Replies: 1
Views: 478

Significant Figures for pH

When calculating pH, is it right that we always assume 3 significant figures for the pH?
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:21 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted Acids and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 504

Re: Bronsted Acids and Bases

If the compound is able to donate a proton, then it is a bronsted acid (e.g CH3COOH). If the compound is able to accept a proton, then it is a bronsted base (e.g. CH3COO-) - notice that the proton is denoted as H+
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Nov 20, 2016 1:11 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure/Expansion effect on products and reactants
Replies: 2
Views: 325

Re: Pressure/Expansion effect on products and reactants

Increase in pressure equals to a decrease in volume; what an increase in pressure does is that it increases all the molar concentrations within the system. What Le Chatelier's principle tells us is that in order to minimize this sudden increase in molar concentration, the equilibrium shifts to the s...
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:06 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: How to determine if ligands are polydentates?
Replies: 2
Views: 443

How to determine if ligands are polydentates?

This question is based on the homework question 33 in chapter 17; I understand that ligands have an atom with an electron pair to donate to form a coordinate bond; but how do you determine e.g. whether H2O is a monodentate and CO3(2-) is a mono/bidentate?
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Nov 06, 2016 9:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Cis Vs. Trans
Replies: 2
Views: 304

Re: Cis Vs. Trans

I think the cis and trans deals with organic chemistry and will not likely be discussed heavily until then
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Mon Oct 24, 2016 5:50 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Question on 3.41
Replies: 1
Views: 282

Re: Question on 3.41

The order that you draw them in is presented by the name of the compound. NH2 and COOH are functional groups in organic compounds, so they always have the same structure (in which for NH2 two H's are bonded to N and for COOH, one O shares a double bond with C while the other O shares a bond with C a...
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Mon Oct 24, 2016 8:42 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Question 61 Chapter 3
Replies: 1
Views: 217

Re: Question 61 Chapter 3

We'll be talking about molecular shapes soon during the lecture regarding the positions of the bonds and lone pairs that contribute to the final structure. In this case, since there are two lone pairs and 4 bonds, the shape forms an octahedral and the angle between the I and Cl atoms are drawn at a ...
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Oct 23, 2016 5:59 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Homework #3.97
Replies: 2
Views: 289

Homework #3.97

The question states to draw the lewis structure of P4 in which each P atom is connected to 3 other P atoms. In the textbook answer section, it draws the P4 structure with a diagonal bond between the 4 P atoms. Is there an explanation for the diagonal bonds?
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Sun Oct 23, 2016 5:50 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Quiz 2 Preparation (Question 1)
Replies: 2
Views: 378

Re: Quiz 2 Preparation (Question 1)

Pi bonds are double bonds and Sigma bonds are single bonds - if you draw out that compound, then there will be 12 sigma bonds (it includes the single bond within the double bond), and 1 pi bond
by Eugenia Kwon 3O
Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:46 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Multiple Limiting Reactants? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 1654

Re: Multiple Limiting Reactants? [ENDORSED]

I agree as well since limiting reagents determine the amount of the product in the reaction. The concept that two limiting reagents exist in a single-step reaction would be hard to visualize since that would mean both would determine the amount of product - which cannot be as calculations will differ.

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