Search found 169 matches

by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 26, 2017 11:02 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming order of things outside the bracket
Replies: 2
Views: 147

Re: naming order of things outside the bracket

When the atom outside is the cation, you name it first. When the atom outside is the anion, you name it last. When it is last, you add the ending -ide. No such thing is necessary when it is first.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:20 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Filling the hybrid orbitals?
Replies: 12
Views: 501

Re: Filling the hybrid orbitals?

I am not sure if this is what you're asking, but when I draw hybridization orbitals, I normally start by drawing the electrons in their appropriate (s or p) orbitals at their ground state (first fill the s orbital, then fill the p orbital with electrons that have a parallel spin before pairing them...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Confused about bond angles
Replies: 1
Views: 123

Confused about bond angles

Hello. I am still confused about bond angles for some shapes. Can someone please check all of these for me? Sea-saw : <90, <120, <180 T-structure : <90, <120, <180 Square pyramidal : <90 Square planar : 90 If they are wrong, if you could explain why they are wrong that would be great. Thanks!
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:02 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Filling the hybrid orbitals?
Replies: 12
Views: 501

Re: Filling the hybrid orbitals?

For a molecule that has 2sp^2 hybridization like in C2H4 shown above, what is the difference between that and sp^2 hybridization? What does the first coefficient actually represent? We usually include the coefficient when it asks of for the composition of each atom. Then, we are describing each bon...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:00 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Filling the hybrid orbitals?
Replies: 12
Views: 501

Re: Filling the hybrid orbitals?

Akshay Anand wrote:Why wouldn't the C2H4 molecule have sp^3 hybridization?


There are 2 areas of electron density surrounding C. C has a triple bond with C and a single bond with hydrogen. Therefore, it is sp.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 8:56 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Question on orbital digrams [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 184

Re: hybridization [ENDORSED]

The atomic orbitals are drawn on the left and hybrid orbitals on the right. Both show the electron ground state. The left one is what one normally draws for the ground-state electron-configuration for that element (before bonding occurs). I did this several times in class and is also shown in the t...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 8:46 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moments
Replies: 3
Views: 215

Re: Dipole Moments

Dipole moments refer to the net polarity of a molecule. You draw them in arrows. The atoms that is more electronegative wants the electrons more. Therefore, the arrow should be drawn to the more electronegative atom. If all of these change vectors cancel each other out (given that they are the same ...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 7:00 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity of NH3?
Replies: 4
Views: 1523

Re: Polarity of NH3?

Maybe you heard ammonium? That would be polar because there is a net dipole moment of 0. Ammonia would definitely be polar because of the lone pair on the nitrogen. The lone pair is why the vectors wouldn't cancel out and why the molecule is now polar. Whenever there is a lone pair on the central at...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 6:54 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Quadratic Equations from ICE Box [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 260

Re: Quadratic Equations from ICE Box [ENDORSED]

When you get 2 positive answers, you take the value that would give you equilibrium concentrations that are lower than the initial concentrations.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 6:53 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Chem Equilibrium Module 3 #29 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 192

Re: Chem Equilibrium Module 3 #29 [ENDORSED]

I am also getting the same thing and I don't understand.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 6:48 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Question on orbital digrams [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 184

Question on orbital digrams [ENDORSED]

When asked to draw the orbital diagrams for hybridization, should we be drawing the one on the left (2s, 2p) is the one on the right ? (2sp2, 2p). Also, on the left why has no promotion occurred? Shouldn’t there be there be 3 arrows in 2p and 1 arrow in 2s?
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:09 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: double bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 409

Re: double bonds

Let's look at the example of O2. The hybridization of O is sp2. Therefore, you know that 3 hybrid orbitals that are sp2. The last orbital is p. The hybrid orbitals make sigma bonds and the non hybrid orbitals make pi bonds.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:02 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.11
Replies: 3
Views: 212

Re: 3.11

Electrons are removed from the outer most energy sub shell. In Co, the electron configuration would be [Ar]3d74s2. Because the cobalt is now Co 3+, 3 electrons are removed. The first 2 are removed from 4s2. The next outermost sub shell is 3d7. So now its just 3d6. In number 9, note that we are only ...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:54 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bonding: Polar and Non-polar
Replies: 6
Views: 381

Re: Covalent Bonding: Polar and Non-polar

If between 2 of the same atoms, you know the bond is non polar. If it is between 2 different atoms but still a covalent bond, you know that it is polar as one of the atoms will be more electronegative than the other. This means that atom will pulls on the electrons more making the bond polar.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:46 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: SiO2
Replies: 4
Views: 672

Re: SiO2

If you read the q, it asks for the bond type. So while the molecule itself may be non polar, the two bonds within are polar. O is more electrons than Si. Therefore, it will pull the electrons more than Si. This will create two polar bonds.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:38 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: different types of bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 327

Re: different types of bonds

A bond is nonpolar if the total dipole moment in a bond is zero. For example, CO2 is a nonpolar molecule. A polar molecule is one that has a nonzero dipole moment. For example, H2O. Both hydrogens have equal dipole moments, but they aren't exactly opposite, so the molecule still has a nonzero dipol...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:41 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Q and K [ENDORSED]
Replies: 35
Views: 1130

Re: Q and K [ENDORSED]

There is no difference between the two formulas. The molar concentrations, however, in k should be the ones at equilibrium. At Q, the molar concentrations can be at any point.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:38 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: R in PV=nRT [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 386

Re: R in PV=nRT [ENDORSED]

R is the gas constant. As the name suggests, its just a constant that you will be given.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:35 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kp and Kc
Replies: 7
Views: 529

Re: Kp and Kc

The former is referring to the partial pressures and the latter is referring to molarity. You use the former with gases and the latter with gases and aqueous solutions.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:34 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: 11.7 Part a
Replies: 3
Views: 270

Re: 11.7 Part a

If you look at the question, it says that the flasks show dissassociation over time. Therefore, you must pick the flask that has no more change by looking at the next flask. You see this occur at flask 3 as in flask 4 there is no change.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:26 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: [Fe(NCS)(OH2)5]2+ name
Replies: 6
Views: 349

Re: [Fe(NCS)(OH2)5]2+ name

Peter Dis1G wrote:Wait, do we need to know the names?


yes! use this

https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/wp-conten ... pounds.pdf
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:23 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Determine the Charge on Ligands
Replies: 4
Views: 423

Re: Determine the Charge on Ligands

On ligands, you have to memorize the charges that were given on the list on his site.

https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/wp-conten ... pounds.pdf
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:22 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: CO3^2- Tridentate
Replies: 2
Views: 173

Re: CO3^2- Tridentate

The oxygen atoms is on the opposite side. If you visualize it, there is no way for it to be binded to all of the oxygen atoms at one. It can barely bind to 2 at once. Hence, it can be mono or bidentate.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:20 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: HW 17.31 b
Replies: 4
Views: 202

Re: HW 17.31 b

Cobalt does have an oxidation number of +3. However, the oxidation number of sulfato is -2. 3-2 means the coordination sphere has an overall charge of +1
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:18 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: HCN
Replies: 2
Views: 133

Re: HCN

There is no metal ion here so it's not a coordination compound. You just go by normal rules and call it hydrogen cyanide.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:16 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Ligand Names
Replies: 6
Views: 241

Re: Ligand Names

by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: HW 17.29 (a)
Replies: 2
Views: 110

Re: HW 17.29 (a)

There are two different ways to write the ligand names. The textbook uses the IUPAC naming conventions, but either can be used. Use this link for more information.

https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/wp-conten ... pounds.pdf
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:14 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 17.31 part D
Replies: 3
Views: 170

Re: 17.31 part D

Yes the order doesn't matter when writing out the ligands. I asked Dr. lavelle this and he affirmed the above statement.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:13 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 187

Re: Naming

by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:12 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Diaqaua
Replies: 9
Views: 433

Re: Diaqaua

Also, I would note that water is sometimes written as OH2 when in the brackets, because the oxygen of the water is what connects it to the central atom. Would water outside the bracket ever be written in OH2 form? No you shouldn't. You write as OH2 to emphasize that at O it binds to the metal ion. ...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:10 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Diaqaua
Replies: 9
Views: 433

Re: Diaqaua

Di aqua just means there are two molecules of water.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:09 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Question 17.29a
Replies: 3
Views: 140

Re: Question 17.29a

Naming metal ions are based on the latin names. In the periodic table, iron is denote as Fe. Thats why we write it as ferrate. But don't stress out too much about these. I asked lavelle and they won't really be covered on the test.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:07 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 17.29 Cobalt vs. Colbaltate
Replies: 3
Views: 170

Re: 17.29 Cobalt vs. Colbaltate

You use cobalt if its part of the cation and cobaltate if its part of the anion
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:06 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming the metal
Replies: 4
Views: 177

Re: Naming the metal

You use -ate if the coordination sphere is an anion and don't when it's a cation.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:05 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: di, bis, tri, tris, etc
Replies: 4
Views: 232

Re: di, bis, tri, tris, etc

You use the former when the atoms are monodentate and don't have a greek prefix (en, dien, ox, edta). So an example would be diaqua. You would use the latter when they are polydentate and do have a greek prefix (en, dien, ox, edta) An example would be bisoxalato
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:02 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 17.33 (whole)
Replies: 3
Views: 242

Re: 17.33 (whole)

Hi! To determine if a molecule is polydentate, you have to understand the geometry and the existence of lone pairs on atoms. For a, there are three atoms that have lone pairs (3 nitrogens). Therefore, you know that the maximum number of places the ligand can bind to the metal ion is 6. B is slightly...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:28 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: 11.13
Replies: 2
Views: 179

Re: 11.13

1 is in the numerator because the products always go over the reactants. If you take the reciprocal of this, you get k for the opposite reaction.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:26 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Using the ICE Box
Replies: 2
Views: 168

Using the ICE Box

I was under the impression that we can only use molarity within the ICE box. Why is it in 11.61 the solutions manual instead decides to keep it in bars instead of converting bars --> atm --> moles --> molarity?? Thank you!
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:06 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Polar or non-polar molecule
Replies: 2
Views: 172

Re: Polar or non-polar molecule

The molecule is polar because it a tetrahedral molecule. Therefore, even if in the Lewis diagram the Cl's and H's are on opposite sides of each other, they won't cancel each other out because of the molecular geometry.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:04 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Energy of Hybrid Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 304

Re: Energy of Hybrid Orbitals

I would say it is an average of the other energies. This is seen by the ideas of s character and p character. The more p character it has, the closer it will be to the p orbitals and the farther it will be from the s orbitals.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:59 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 3
Views: 157

Re: Polydentate

A molecule is polydentate if it can bind to more than one lone pair of electrons on 2 DIFFERENT atoms.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:57 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: writing chemical formula based on name
Replies: 4
Views: 154

Re: writing chemical formula based on name

When ordering them in the chemical formula, the cation goes first and then the anion. Within the coordination sphere, you put the metal ion first. What follows after should be in the alphabetical order that you would go by when normally just writing the full compound out.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:05 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Central atom
Replies: 2
Views: 139

Re: Central atom

They are both right. If it has low ionization energy, it has low electron affinity. Atoms with a low ionization energies are one the left of the periodic table. They have a low ionization energy bc they really want to give up that electron. Atoms with a low electron affinity are also on the left of ...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:55 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Is the ionic/covalent electronegativity value guideline absolute?
Replies: 2
Views: 209

Re: Is the ionic/covalent electronegativity value guideline absolute?

If the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, it is covalent. It is greater than 2, it is ionic. Everything in between is not absolute. The higher it is in between 1.5 and 2, the more ionic character it may display. However, it being either ionic or covalent differs with eacf one.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:52 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 9
Views: 364

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Ionic bonds have a very high difference in electronegativities. They tend to occur between a metal and a nonmetal as metals (metals have low electronegativities and nonmetals have high electronegativities). Covalent bonds, by comparison, have a low difference in electronegativity. They tend to occur...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:48 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: oxidation state
Replies: 3
Views: 230

Re: oxidation state

Oxidation state refers to the number of electrons and atom can lose, gain, or share. Cl can have a positive oxidation state of Cl (+7) which means that it looses 7 electrons to fill the octet. It can also have a negative oxidation state in which it gains an electron to fill the octet. While the form...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:22 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Explaining Octet Rule Exceptions
Replies: 2
Views: 264

Re: Explaining Octet Rule Exceptions

Going off of the question relating to expanded octets in period 3. Besides there being 3d to fill excess electrons, the atoms are large enough to accomadate more electrons.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:19 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octets
Replies: 8
Views: 467

Re: Octets

Nonmetal atoms in period 3 and higher can have can expand their octets. This can occur bc 1) the existence of empty d orbitals and 2) The size of the atom. For sulfur, because it is large enough, it can accommodate more electrons than the octet. P and Cl can do the same.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:16 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: The expanded octet in PCl5
Replies: 2
Views: 329

The expanded octet in PCl5

On page 87 in the tb, it says that "In PCl5, the P atom has expanded its valence shell to 10 electrons by using 1 d orbital." Can someone please explain to me why it uses the d orbital? It seems to me that the 3p orbital should be suffice.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:55 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Difference between subshell and orbital [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 1133

Re: Difference between subshell and orbital [ENDORSED]

A subshell refers to the angular momentum quantum number (s,p,d,f) and the orbital refers to the magnetic quantum number. Each subshell has a certain number of quantum numbers (2l + 1).
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:51 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodes
Replies: 4
Views: 305

Re: Nodes

Alright so a wavefunction is just referring to a subshell (s, p, d, f...). n - 1 is just referring to the number of nodal planes within each subshell. Like in n = 2 (l is 1 or p), there is one nodal plane.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:43 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: d and s blocks
Replies: 16
Views: 705

Re: d and s blocks

D blocks are lower in energy than s blocks when they are filled. For this reason, they are written before.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:41 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: orbitals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 237

Re: orbitals [ENDORSED]

Sub shells refer to the angular momentum quantum number. Some examples include s, p, d, f... Orbitals, on the other hand, refer to the magnetic quantum number. The number of electrons in a subshell is equal to the number of electrons in all the orbitals. But each orbital can only have a max of 2 ele...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:35 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 4s and 3d orbitals
Replies: 5
Views: 403

Re: 4s and 3d orbitals

when there are electrons in the 3d orbital, they automatically are of lower energy than 4s. For this reason, even if there are electrons in the 3d orbital, the electrons will be lost from the 4s orbital.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:48 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: 1st and 2nd ionization energy? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 915

Re: 1st and 2nd ionization energy? [ENDORSED]

The first ionization energy refers to the amount of energy needed to get one electron from the outer most energy level. The second ionization energy refers to the amount of energy needed to get one more electron out of the outer most energy level.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:46 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Px, Py, Pz
Replies: 10
Views: 529

Re: Px, Py, Pz

I believe because this is the way he did it in class, we should be writing it in this manner as the p orbital has these nodal planes
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:43 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron configuration
Replies: 4
Views: 190

Re: Electron configuration

We should be including the subshells! For example, if we had something like Carbon, we should say (1s2)(2s2)(2px1)(2py1).
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:43 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron configuration
Replies: 4
Views: 190

Re: Electron configuration

We should be including the subshells! For example, if we had something like Carbon, we should say (1s2)(2s2)(2px1)(2py1).
by AtreyiMitra2L
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: emission and absorption spectrum
Replies: 3
Views: 216

emission and absorption spectrum

Are these spectrums interchangeable?
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 9:23 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: EM Radiation and wave/particle [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 181

EM Radiation and wave/particle [ENDORSED]

Why can EM radiation pass through foil and how does this show that it acts as a wave rather than a particle? Aluminum seems to not allow the passage of radio waves... can this potentially undermine the fact that its a wave?
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 9:18 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1.11 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 265

Re: 1.11 [ENDORSED]

The question is basically referring what lower energy level the electron will jump to. Everything in the Lyman series (ie n = 2,3,4,5,6...) should jump to n = 1. Everything in the Balmer series should jump to n = 2. This is the same for the other two series. These two series are in reference to Hydr...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 9:04 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: De Broehli [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 260

Re: De Broehli [ENDORSED]

To derive the equation, you basically have to do with the person before me told you to do. Now for the second part of your question, they are the same. We use light in our attempt to understand atoms better. This is one of those many instances. Also, the values for what is emitted and absorbed are b...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1.3 homework [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 490

Re: 1.3 homework [ENDORSED]

What actually helped me understand this question was kind of drawing 2 graphs: one with the normal frequency and one with a lower frequency. The one with a lower frequency should have a smaller amplitude. C is saying that "the extent of change at a given point decreases". Take the same ran...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1.3 homework [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 490

Re: 1.3 homework [ENDORSED]

What actually helped me understand this question was kind of drawing 2 graphs: one with the normal frequency and one with a lower frequency. The one with a lower frequency should have a smaller amplitude. C is saying that "the extent of change at a given point decreases". Take the same ran...
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:42 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Understanding the Rydberg Formula [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 404

Re: Understanding the Rydberg Formula [ENDORSED]

Frequency should never be negative. Consequently, the negative sign should be omitted. The energy, however, still should be negative. It is this value that shows that the electron went from a higher energy level to a lower energy level.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:39 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Excitation of electrons
Replies: 5
Views: 244

Re: Excitation of electrons

1 million electrons would be excited to a higher energy level. The photoelectric effect shows how photons can act as particles. Because each has a sufficient wavelength (as noted by the fact they are in the UV region), all should be excited.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:27 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: #of molecules/atoms/formula units
Replies: 3
Views: 234

Re: #of molecules/atoms/formula units

You derive each of the following the same way through Avagadro's #. However, while the number may be the same, the units will definitely be different. You would use formula units when talking about ionic compounds, molecules with covalent compounds, and atoms with elements.
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:24 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Formula Units
Replies: 7
Views: 344

Re: Formula Units

Formula units refer specifically to ionic compounds. Molecules are for covalent compounds. Atoms are for only elements (diatomic molecules not included).
by AtreyiMitra2L
Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:23 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Formula Units
Replies: 7
Views: 344

Re: Formula Units

Formula units refer specifically to ionic compounds. Molecules are for covalent compounds. Atoms are for only elements (diatomic molecules not included).

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