Search found 110 matches

by Ariel Davydov 1C
Tue Oct 08, 2019 3:40 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Polyatomic Ions
Replies: 2
Views: 64

Re: Polyatomic Ions

The TA from the Sunday workshop in Covel said that he will typically provide the molecular formulas/polyatomic ions mentioned in problems on the test, but to be safe, I would know a few of the common ones, as listed in the comment above.
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Tue Oct 08, 2019 3:39 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Test 1
Replies: 11
Views: 190

Re: Test 1

Studying the concepts will definitely help in being able to complete the calculations, but I feel the majority of questions will be calculation-based.
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Tue Oct 08, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: M9... help!
Replies: 3
Views: 75

Re: M9... help!

Hi! The reason why the equation may look off compared to the actual molecular formulas of the molecules listed is because the answer is the net ionic equation, not the molecular equation. This can be reached by "breaking down" the aqueous, soluble molecules (aka the reactants copper (II) n...
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Tue Oct 08, 2019 3:20 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Practice Problems?
Replies: 11
Views: 216

Re: Practice Problems?

Practice problems are listed on "Outline 1: Review of Chemical & Physical Principles" under the Learning Outcomes section on Lavelle's Chem 14A website. All assigned questions can be found in the 7th edition Chemical Principles textbook.
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:36 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Homework Problem G.25
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Homework Problem G.25

Practitioners of the branch of alternative medicine known as homeopathy claim that very dilute solutions of substances can have an effect. Is the claim plausible? To explore this question, suppose that you prepare a solution of a supposedly active sub- stance, X, with a molar concentration of 0.10 ...
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:25 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: homework question G5
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: homework question G5

Even though the compound does dissolve into ions, you would still approach this as a regular molarity/dilution problem, using M1V1 = M2V2 to find the initial volume of solution necessary in order to obtain the moles and molarities given in each part of the problem. This can be determined using the m...
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:19 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant figures clarification
Replies: 3
Views: 76

Re: Significant figures clarification

The number of sig figs in the measurements given in the problem is the same number of sig figs you will use in your final answer. For example, if you are given a mass of 2.35g of a compound, you would use 3 sig figs in your final answer, as what you are given possesses 3 sig figs as well.
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:11 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Metal Sulfides and Molar Mass
Replies: 3
Views: 66

Re: Metal Sulfides and Molar Mass

A metal sulfide is a compound composed of any metal and sulfur. In this problem, we are given an unknown metal (M) as a part of the hydroxide M(OH)2 with a molar mass of 74.10 g/mol. This simply means that we must determine the unknown metal in this hydroxide first in order to obtain the molar mass ...
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:00 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing equations
Replies: 7
Views: 176

Re: Balancing equations

Balanced equations should show a clear ratio between reactants and products using whole number integers. Having fractions or decimals as coefficients in a step to balancing an equation is acceptable, as long as the final answer has only whole number integers as coefficients.
by Ariel Davydov 1C
Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:26 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Homework Problem E.9
Replies: 4
Views: 105

Re: Homework Problem E.9

To find the number of oxygen atoms, you must first find the number of moles in 5.15g of epsom salt. This can be found by dividing the given mass (5.15g) by the molar mass (246.3g/mol), which leaves you with 0.0209 moles of epsom salt. From here, you must use the mole ratio of oxygen to epsom salt in...

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