Search found 107 matches

by JChen_2I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:21 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: hw problem 1.A.15
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: hw problem 1.A.15

Just to clarify, we sub in 1 for n2 because n2 is the final energy level right? And n1 is the initial energy level? So it should be final n subtracted by the initial n
by JChen_2I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1A11
Replies: 1
Views: 41

HW 1A11

In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series (for example, Balmer series or Lyman series). What is common to the lines within the series that makes grouping them together logical? Could someone explain the answer to this? I'm not sure I...
by JChen_2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:08 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H.25 Question
Replies: 3
Views: 96

Re: H.25 Question

We did this problem in our discussion and my TA said it's something you should just know like how O is O2
by JChen_2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:06 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: 5 Homework Problems Due
Replies: 21
Views: 260

Re: 5 Homework Problems Due

5 problems from any section under review of chemical and physical principles are good and due at this Friday's lecture. In the future, the five problems per week will be due to the professor. I'd recommend doing most or all of the problems anyway for practice though :)
by JChen_2I
Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:53 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Fundamentals Practice Problem E3
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: Fundamentals Practice Problem E3

What I did was I counted 9 atoms of gallium in the picture and converted that value to moles then grams and I got 1.046 * 10^-21g of gallium. Then I took that value and converted it to moles of astatine then atoms and got 3 atoms of astatine.
by JChen_2I
Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:48 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Chapter F Problem 15
Replies: 4
Views: 85

Re: Chapter F Problem 15

You would solve for a sample of 100g therefore you'd have 67.49g of carbon, 4.60g of hydrogen, 12.45g of chlorine, 9.84g of nitrogen, and 5.62 g of oxygen. Convert these masses to moles using their molar mass and then divide by the smallest molar value which is chlorine with 0.3512 mol. Divide the m...
by JChen_2I
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:41 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Tips for Balancing Chemical Equations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 14
Views: 237

Re: Tips for Balancing Chemical Equations [ENDORSED]

I usually start with balancing the element that occurs the least and go from there. I like keeping a list of the number of atoms for each element on both sides (reactants and products) and updating the number as I balance and add coefficients. It helps you remember which elements are and aren't yet ...

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