Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

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Dayna Pham 1I
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Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

Postby Dayna Pham 1I » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:35 pm

Hello!
I’m working on question E16, which asks to find the chloride of a mystery metal. The mystery metal is determined by using its molar mass, which we calculate.

Anyways, the mystery metal turned out to be Ag. Since silver is a transition metal, how do we determine its charge?

Do we just assume the charge is +1 because it asks for the chloride of this metal?

Thank you!

Tuong Nguyen 2I
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Re: Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

Postby Tuong Nguyen 2I » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:42 pm

Yes the charge of Ag would be +1 in this case. Transition metals are stated to have an oxidation state of 0 (having no charge) so when combined with another element like Cl which usually has a -1 charge in chemistry problems, you assume that the transition metal takes on a charge that would stabilize the compound. Hopefully this helped.

Andrew Lam 3B
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Re: Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

Postby Andrew Lam 3B » Sun Sep 30, 2018 4:21 pm

Silver generally is found in the +1 oxidation state.

Other ones of note are Iron being +2 or +3, copper being +1, etc.

Matthew Tran 1H
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Re: Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

Postby Matthew Tran 1H » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:34 pm

We cannot assume the metal has a +1 charge simply because it is bonded with chlorine. A classic example would be calcium chloride, CaCl2. Calcium will always have a +2 charge in an ionic compound. Also make sure to specify the oxidation state of a transition metal when naming the compound if the transition metal has multiple oxidation states! Ex. Fe2O3 is iron(III) oxide.

Max Hayama 4K
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Re: Question E16 - Transition Metal Charge

Postby Max Hayama 4K » Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:10 pm

Silver will normally occupy an oxidation state of +1; it is just a common known transition metal oxidation number that is handy to memorize. Other honorable mentions include aluminum, which has an oxidation number of +3, and zinc, which has an oxidation number of +2.


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