nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Ann Zhang_1M
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Ann Zhang_1M » Fri Mar 03, 2017 12:46 pm

When we are writing the formulas for nucleophile and electrophile reactions, do we need to use arrows to indicate the movement of electrons?

Soonwoo Chung 1D
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Soonwoo Chung 1D » Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:17 am

Yes, you must always show the arrows when drawing the organic reactions. The arrows represent the electron flow in proposed mechanisms and must be curved. The arrows should also start from the electron rich region, and go towards the region that is electron deficient.

Desiree Martin 2A
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Desiree Martin 2A » Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:13 pm

When drawing organic reactions, it is pertinent to use curved arrows in order to represent the electron movement from an e- rich region to a deficient region. In other words, the arrow represents the movement of electrons from a nucleophile to an electrophile. The nucleophile of a reaction is usually a double bond or a lone pair on a molecule, and when there is two electrons moving we use a full arrow head to represent the pair. However, when there is only one electron moving, we use a half arrow head to represent this. Another thing to note, is that the electrophile of the reaction usually has a positive charge or it has a positive pull due to electronegativity.

Chem_Mod
Posts: 17949
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 406 times

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Mar 06, 2017 11:18 am

If you are asked to write a reaction, you do not need to used curved arrows to show electron movement. For example if asked to give an example of an electrophilic addition reaction, you can simple write H2C=CH2 + HBr --> H2BrC-CH3. If you are asked about the mechanism for this reaction, then you do need to show the individual steps and electron movement with curved arrows.

Michael Cheng 1C
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Michael Cheng 1C » Fri Mar 16, 2018 6:38 pm

do we need to know nucleophiles and electrophiles for the final? What is the difference between them?

Cassandra Mullen 1E
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Cassandra Mullen 1E » Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:40 pm

Michael Cheng 1C wrote:do we need to know nucleophiles and electrophiles for the final? What is the difference between them?

The nucleophile is the molecule/ion that donates electrons and the electrophile is the molecule/ion that accepts the electrons.

Hadji Yono-Cruz 2L
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: nucleophile and electrophile reactions

Postby Hadji Yono-Cruz 2L » Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:58 pm

You only draw the curved arrows when asked for the mechanism.


Return to “*Electrophilic Addition”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest