axial/equatorial positions for multiple substituents

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Wendy_Liu_3A
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

axial/equatorial positions for multiple substituents

Postby Wendy_Liu_3A » Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:15 pm

To ensure the highest stability, we put substituents on the equatorial positions. What I'm unsure is, when there are two substituents adjacent to each other, do we put both of them in equatorial positions?

What if there are multiple substituents - can I put all of them in equatorial positions if cis/trans is not specified? Thank you!

Michelle_Tan_1G
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:28 am

Re: axial/equatorial positions for multiple substituents

Postby Michelle_Tan_1G » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:06 pm

When you say adjacent to each other, do you mean on the same C atom? In that case, one would be axial and one equatorial. Otherwise, the more complex/heavier atom is put in the equatorial position. I think it's because it is more likely to be unstable/produce stronger repulsions.

Wendy_Liu_3A
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

Re: axial/equatorial positions for multiple substituents

Postby Wendy_Liu_3A » Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:35 am

Sorry I meant to say, they are on different atoms but next to each other. If you look at problem set #1, viewtopic.php?f=88&t=20700&p=59306&hilit=problem+set&sid=1a75ec9167f0318e98a48d5e305b4b6a#p59306, some substituents are attached to different carbon next to each other but one is axial while the other is equatorial...


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