M21

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Curtis Ngo_4E
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

M21

Postby Curtis Ngo_4E » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:03 am

I don't really understand how to approach this problem..

A compound found in the nucleus of a human cell was found to be composed of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. A combustion analysis of 1.35 g of the compound produced 2.20 g of the CO2 and 0.901 g of the H2O. When a separate 0.500-g sample of the compound was analyzed for nitrogen, 0.130 g of N2 was produced. What is the empirical formula of the compound?

Do you begin by attempting to discern the masses of each of the molecules?

jennifer_zhou2C
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: M21

Postby jennifer_zhou2C » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:10 pm

Yes. Attempt to find out how much each element would weigh, then find out the percentage of element in each atom. Convert percentages to whole numbers (pretending the sample is made of 100 grams is easiest) and then find the empirical/molecular formula from then on.

jennifer_zhou2C
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: M21

Postby jennifer_zhou2C » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:13 pm

Sorry. I made a typo. Find out the percentage of the element in the molecule. You can do that by dividing the mass of the element by the mass of the sample given.


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