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Black Body

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 12:16 am
by Diane Kang 2F
The textbook defines a 'black body' as an "object that absorbs and emits all frequencies of radiation without favor." However, quantum mechanics is all about energy existing in packets and thus limit to certain frequencies, meaning not "all" frequencies of radiation is possible.

Considering quantum mechanics, does the definition of a black body still hold true?

Re: Black Body

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:10 pm
by Patrick Cai 1L
Given that blackbody radiation was observed as a macroscopic effect, the generalizations produced by classic blackbody radiation theory holds true for classic mechanics. However, if we were to consider the quantized nature of matter, increasingly specific analyses of blackbody radiation fails at the atomic level, making the blackbody radiation idea void if quantum mechanics are the dominant effect.

Re: Black Body

Posted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:12 pm
by IScarvie 1E
Black bodies are an idealization; an actual black body that emits and absorbs all frequencies does not exist. Stars are approximately like black bodies, but not exactly

Re: Black Body

Posted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:21 pm
by rachel liu 3k
Are black bodies related to black holes?

Re: Black Body

Posted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:42 pm
by Bradley Whitworth 4B
The idea of Black Body is theoretical in that if an object truly did absorb and emit all frequencies of light it would actually be invisible. So, if you're looking to invent invisibility this is a good place to start. :)