Nitrogen

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Katie Lam 1B
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Nitrogen

Postby Katie Lam 1B » Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:17 pm

When a problem states that nitrogen is formed, can we always assume that the product is gaseous nitrogen (N2)?

Jessica Nunez 1I
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Nitrogen

Postby Jessica Nunez 1I » Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:25 pm

Yes. If a problem states that nitrogen is produced in their elemental form, then we can assume the product is gaseous nitrogen and that it is a diatomic molecule (N2).

Alyssa Pelak 1J
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Nitrogen

Postby Alyssa Pelak 1J » Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:52 am

Also, just to help with future questions, this can be assumed with all of the diatomic molecules. Br, I, N, Cl, H, O, and F. You can remember them as BrINClHOF (brinkl-hoff) or Have(H) No(N) Fear(F) Of(O) Ice(I) Cold(Cl) Beer(Br). Hope this helps

Yizhou Liu 3L
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Nitrogen

Postby Yizhou Liu 3L » Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:20 am

Yes. Nitrogen can only maintain in a liquid state at extremely low temperature or extremely high pressure. Its boiling point is 77K under atmospheric pressure, which means in most cases it is gaseous.

Victoria Draper 1G
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am
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Re: Nitrogen

Postby Victoria Draper 1G » Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:11 am

Since nitrogen is a diatomic particle, it can always be assumed that when it is produced (especially under extremely high temperatures) it usually consists of 2. An easy acronym to remember which elements appear in twos is BrINClHOF.

Hope this helps!

David Zhou 1L
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Nitrogen

Postby David Zhou 1L » Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:04 pm

I've found there's no need at all for a complicated mnemonic to memorize which gases form diatomic molecules; that just makes things harder, because you have to recall the entire string of elements in your word or phrase to pick out the single one you need.

To me, it's far easier to just look at the periodic table and remember the upside down L-shape that these elements form:

N O F
----Cl
----Br
----I

And don't forget about H.

You can get the same info in a single quick glance if you know what you're looking for.


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