H5 7th edition

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Karolina herrera1F
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Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:15 am

H5 7th edition

Postby Karolina herrera1F » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:16 pm

Does anyone know if the (N3) count towards balancing it . For example, by the (OH)2 having the little 2 at the bottom effect the balancing of the equation. If so why ? And if not why not?

Chem_Mod
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Re: H5 7th edition

Postby Chem_Mod » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:30 pm

Any subscript tells you the number of atoms in a compound. N subscript 3 means three nitrogen atoms. (OH)2 is two oxygens and two hydrogens. If you have a coefficient like 2 in front of (OH)2, that means you have 4 oxygens and 4 hydrogens.

Zachary Menz 1D
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Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2018 12:17 am

Re: H5 7th edition

Postby Zachary Menz 1D » Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:20 pm

It counts towards balancing the equation because subscripts display the number of atoms of a particular type. The important thing to remember regarding subscripts is that if you have, for example, (OH)2 where 2 is a subscript, you have 2 O atoms and 2 H atoms. In other words, the subscript 2 is sort of distributed into the parenthesis.

somyapanchal1D
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Re: H5 7th edition

Postby somyapanchal1D » Sun Jun 30, 2019 2:13 pm

Yes, the subscript does count toward balancing the chemical equations. For example, if you have MgSO4, the subscript is the 4. In this case, the 4 means that there are 4 oxygen atoms. So whenever you have a subscript that comes after an element, it refers to the number of atoms of that element. Another example is 5H20. This means that there are 5 water molecules and each water molecule has 2 hydrogen atoms. Thus, the 5 water molecules have 10 hydrogen atoms (5*2). You must account for these numbers when balancing chemical reactions

Yen Ho Chou 1D
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Re: H5 7th edition

Postby Yen Ho Chou 1D » Sun Jun 30, 2019 4:47 pm

I think the small number that follows it means you have to multiply the two numbers


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