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balancing reaction law

Posted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 2:51 am
by D-nice1D
It appears that balancing the chemical equation Cu + SO2 S CuO + S would be simple if we could just add another O atom to the product side:
Cu + SO2 S CuO + S + O. (a) Why is that balancing procedure not allowed? (b) Balance the equation correctly.

I'm not sure what the actual correct answer to A is.

Re: balancing reaction law

Posted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 10:13 am
by Chem_Mod
You cannot add new reactants or products to a chemical equation. You can only change the ratio of what substances are there, using stoichiometric coefficients to balance the number of atoms.

Re: balancing reaction law

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:36 pm
by Haorui Li 1A
You cannot add a product to the chemical equation because a chemical equation describes a chemical reaction, it is an expression that gives the identities and quantities of the substances involved in a reaction, if the product was not there originally, you cannot add one. Balancing chemical equation only involves changes in coefficients before each compound, so you need to calculate.

Re: balancing reaction law

Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 8:15 am
by Julianna Laurentano 4G
As stated above, you cannot add reactants or products to the chemical equation, as the total mass before must equal the total mass after. However, you may use coefficients to make sure each side of the reaction is balanced in respect to the atoms of each element.

Re: balancing reaction law

Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 8:54 am
by PGao_1B
In chemical reactions atoms are not created or destroyed. Total mass before = total mass after. The law of conservation of mass states that the total atoms of reactants = the total atoms of products, so you cannot add reactants or products to a chemical equation.