Diatomic elements?

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Jedrick Zablan 3L
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Diatomic elements?

Postby Jedrick Zablan 3L » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:12 pm

Why do the seven diatomic elements (Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, and Bromine) have to come in pairs? Why can they not stand alone in a chemical equation?

WUng_1D
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby WUng_1D » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:17 pm

They are diatomic because they always exist in this form in real life, you will never find oxygen or any of the other diatomic elements.

charleejohnson1L
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Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby charleejohnson1L » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:18 pm

I'm pretty positive it's because they're unstable in singularity and/or they naturally occur in nature as diatomic. :)

Michelle Chan 1J
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Michelle Chan 1J » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:20 pm

I think that's just how they naturally occur. For example, you won't find just one singular oxygen atom, thus we make them diatomic in chemical equations.

Eunice Nguyen 4I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Eunice Nguyen 4I » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:27 pm

They come in pairs to be more stable ^^

Jedrick Zablan 3L
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Jedrick Zablan 3L » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:09 pm

Thank you guys for the help :)

Diana A 2L
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Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Diana A 2L » Fri Oct 04, 2019 7:17 pm

I would note that for diatomic elements it is important to remember to use molar mass of 32.0g/mol when doing stoichiometry calculations that ask questions like, "how many moles of oxygen does THIS reaction produce". Since oxygen naturally occurs in pairs:)

Lauren Lewis3L
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Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Lauren Lewis3L » Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:53 pm

In this case, are we required to assume that oxygen is always two even in a chemical equation so that when finding the molar mass it is 32.00 and not 16.00?

Ryan Chang 1C
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Diatomic elements?

Postby Ryan Chang 1C » Sun Oct 06, 2019 12:09 am

In response to Lauren, I believe that chemical equations will already show that oxygen by itself is diatomic, as well as the other diatomic molecules. Also, an easy way to remember the diatomic molecules is:

Have (hydrogen)
No (nitrogen)
Fear (fluorine)
Of (oxygen)
Ice (iodine)
Cold (chlorine)
Beer (bromine)


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