Partial pressures


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Kevin Hernandez 3A
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Partial pressures

Postby Kevin Hernandez 3A » Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:03 am

The reaction 2 SO2 (g) + O2 (g) ⇌ 2 SO3 (g) occurs in a 1.00 L flask at 312 K and at equilibrium the concentrations are 0.075 mol.L-1 SO2 (g), 0.537 mol.L-1 O2 (g), and 0.925 mol.L-1 SO3 (g). Calculate their respective partial pressures at 312 K using R = 8.206 × 10-2 L.atm.K-1.mol-1.

Andrea Grigsby 1I
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Re: Partial pressures

Postby Andrea Grigsby 1I » Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:07 am

use the equation PV=nRT and substitute the values in

Adrian Franco 3H
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Re: Partial pressures

Postby Adrian Franco 3H » Tue Nov 28, 2017 1:57 pm

Solve for P using P= (n/v)(R)(T). They already give us the concentrations, which is mol.L, or n/v. Substitute the different concentrations into the equation and you get the respective pressures for each gas.

Guangyu Li 2J
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Re: Partial pressures

Postby Guangyu Li 2J » Sat Dec 02, 2017 11:58 pm

Dalton Law of Partial Pressure is the theorem for the ideal gases specifically.

First of all, the gases suitable for this law must be ideal gases.

According to this law, if the gases in the container don't react with each other, every kinds of gases are distributed evenly in the container. The pressure they exert each is equal to the pressure they occupy in the container.

Kailie_Giebink_1E
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Re: Partial pressures

Postby Kailie_Giebink_1E » Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:46 am

yes you use pv=nrt


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