Understanding Q


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briannam_1F
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Understanding Q

Postby briannam_1F » Wed Jan 08, 2020 2:06 pm

When calculating for Q do we omit solids and pure liquids as well?

JohnWalkiewicz2J
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby JohnWalkiewicz2J » Wed Jan 08, 2020 2:08 pm

Considering you omit solids and liquids when calculating the equilibrium constant, I would say yes, leave out solids and liquids when calculating the reaction quotient.

sarahsalama2E
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby sarahsalama2E » Wed Jan 08, 2020 2:10 pm

Yes you would also leave out solids and liquids because their concentrations do not change. Also just to refresh, Q is the reaction quotient when the reaction is NOT at equilibrium and if Q <K, reaction favors the forward direction, and if Q>K, then reaction favors the backwards direction, and if Q=K, then the reaction is at equilibrium.

Vincent Leong 2B
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Vincent Leong 2B » Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:11 pm

In the reaction, whether it's at equilibrium or not, solids and liquids are pure substances. This means, that no matter how the reaction goes, the overall reaction will not change the substance significantly enough for its concentration to change. That is why at equilibrium (for K constant) and the reaction quotient (Q), the concentration of that pure substance has no impact on the constant values -- because these substances have such an insignificant change in concentration that they practically cancel out when put into that ratio.

Pablo 1K
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Pablo 1K » Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:55 pm

Yes you would leave them out of your final expression.

Callum Guo 1H
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Callum Guo 1H » Wed Jan 08, 2020 10:13 pm

Yeah you only count things that are in aqeuous states and gas states if you are calculated the equilibrium for pressure

Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I » Wed Jan 08, 2020 10:20 pm

When solving for Q you would leave out solids and liquids.

Juana Abana 1G
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Juana Abana 1G » Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:45 am

Yes you would leave out solids and liquids.

Diana Andrade_4F
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Diana Andrade_4F » Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:51 pm

Yes, you don't include solids and liquids, only whatever is in gaseous/aqueous states when calculating Q.

Megan Kirschner
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby Megan Kirschner » Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:56 pm

I understand the fact that you omit solids and liquids when calculating the equilibrium constant, but why? What's the logic behind it?

Leyna Dang 2H
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Understanding Q

Postby Leyna Dang 2H » Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:38 pm

Megan Kirschner wrote:I understand the fact that you omit solids and liquids when calculating the equilibrium constant, but why? What's the logic behind it?


Solids and liquids aren't included because they do not have a significant effect on the concentration. Lavelle also mentioned during lecture that solids do not have concentrations, so it wouldn't make sense to include them.

205150314
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby 205150314 » Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:40 pm

briannam_1F wrote:When calculating for Q do we omit solids and pure liquids as well?


Yes you would leave them out because Q is pretty much K, with the difference being that Q is at any time during the reaction but you would calculate it the same way as K

RobertXu_2J
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Understanding Q

Postby RobertXu_2J » Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:45 am

Yes you would, because the calculations for Q are the same as for K, except that the values used may be different.

gabbymaraziti
Posts: 95
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Re: Understanding Q

Postby gabbymaraziti » Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:17 am

I believe we would omit pure solids and liquids because Q is calculated in the same way as K.


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