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Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 6:19 am
by McKenna_4A
Why exactly aren't solids and liquids included in equilibrium expressions?

Re: Solids and Liquids  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 9:36 am
by Fiona Latifi 1A
Solids and liquids are considered pure substances. Therefore they have an activity value of 1. So in equilibrium expressions, we do not include them because their value would just be 1.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 10:16 am
by Wendy 1E
It does not make sense for solids to have a concentration since the units for concentration are mol/L. For liquids, the change in concentration is insignificant because the change is very small.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:12 pm
by Rebecca Remple 1C
I agree with Fiona and McKenna! However, I am still confused on the matter of liquids being pure substancews. Can someone clarify how a liquid is different from an aqueous solution and give examples of each? From what I understand, aqueous solutions have a solute and solvent, and liquids do not. Can someone explain this a little more? Thank you!

-Rebecca

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:38 pm
by KHowe_1D
They aren't calculated in equilibrium expressions because they are considered pure substances which don't affect the equilibrium concentration.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:46 pm
by Donavin Collins 1F
Since solids and liquids are considered pure substances, they wouldn't affect the equilibrium concentration.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:49 pm
by Kayla Maldonado 1C
Rebecca Remple 1C wrote:I agree with Fiona and McKenna! However, I am still confused on the matter of liquids being pure substancews. Can someone clarify how a liquid is different from an aqueous solution and give examples of each? From what I understand, aqueous solutions have a solute and solvent, and liquids do not. Can someone explain this a little more? Thank you!

-Rebecca


Liquidity is a state of matter where it can flow, takes the shape of its container, and has surface tension. Aqueous is a solution where water is the solvent. “Aqueous” means “similar to,” “related to,” or “dissolved in water.”

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:56 pm
by 805394719
Solids and liquids are excluded from the equilibrium constant expression because their concentration equals their density divided by their molar mass. Since the density of a pure solid or liquid is constant regardless of how much solid or liquid is present, their concentrations stay constant throughout the reaction. Because their concentration does not change, they are not included in the equilibrium expression.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:57 pm
by Rebecca Remple 1C
Kayla Maldonado 1A wrote:
Rebecca Remple 1C wrote:I agree with Fiona and McKenna! However, I am still confused on the matter of liquids being pure substancews. Can someone clarify how a liquid is different from an aqueous solution and give examples of each? From what I understand, aqueous solutions have a solute and solvent, and liquids do not. Can someone explain this a little more? Thank you!

-Rebecca


Liquidity is a state of matter where it can flow, takes the shape of its container, and has surface tension. Aqueous is a solution where water is the solvent. “Aqueous” means “similar to,” “related to,” or “dissolved in water.”

Hi Kayla,

Thank you so much for your explanation! It helps a lot :) Good luck on the test and have a great weekend!

-Rebecca

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 3:03 pm
by Sanjana Borle 2K
Also for solids and liquids, pressure does not affect them, in other words they can't be compressed further, whereas gases can.

Re: Solids and Liquids

Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pm
by Matthew Tsai 2H
Regardless of conditions, solids and liquids will be pure substances with a concentration of 1, so for calculating the equilibrium constant of a reaction, they would have no effect.