ICE Table


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Deena Doan 2F
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

ICE Table

Postby Deena Doan 2F » Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:39 pm

How do you use an ICE table?

Kevin Xu 4F
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby Kevin Xu 4F » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:08 am

An ICE table shows the initial, change, and equilibrium concentration values for a reaction at equilibrium. To solve it, you would need to find the equilibrium expression K for the reaction and the starting/ending values of the initial or end concentrations. To solve for the unknown, plug the known and unknown variables into the equilibrium expression K and solve using algebra.

Michelle N - 2C
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Re: ICE Table

Postby Michelle N - 2C » Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:41 am

To add on from the previous reply, an ICE table basically lays out the initial concentration, the change it endures, followed by the equilibrium concentration amount afterward. You start off by writing out the table and then inputting what's given in the problem into its respective spots. From then, you can then use what you know (e.g. if there isn't any product initially and then at the equilibrium constant has something, then you know that in the change, there must be some added amount). The way I remember it is initial + change = equilibrium, therefore ICE. Hope that helps!

cassidysong 1K
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Re: ICE Table

Postby cassidysong 1K » Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:08 pm

An ICE table shows the change in concentrations the reactants and products go through from the beginning of the reaction to the end. I stands for initial, c stands for change, and e stands for equilibrium.

Izzie Capra 2E
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Re: ICE Table

Postby Izzie Capra 2E » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:53 am

Yes, and when using an ice table, make sure you check to make sure the equation you are looking at is balanced because the stoichiometric coefficients will play a role in the Change in concentration step. The coefficient will proceed the x term.

faithkim1L
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby faithkim1L » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:09 pm

An ICE table is used for equilibrium concentrations when we are unsure of the amount of change (in molarity) in the reactants as the chemical reaction moves to equilibrium. I stands for initial, which are the molarities that are given. Sometimes, the problem will only provide the moles and the container volume, and you will have to convert into molarity. C stands for change, which is the change that each reactant and product goes through as the reaction goes to equilibrium. Most people designate change as x, with a coefficient in front depending on the molar ratio (from the chemical equation). E stands for equilibrium, which is the concentration of the molecules at equilibrium. This is the addition of the I and C for each molecule. After that, you would use Kc in order to calculate the actual change (x).

MeeraBhagat
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby MeeraBhagat » Thu Jan 16, 2020 4:58 pm

ICE tables are used when you need to find out the equilibrium concentrations of products or reactants when only given the initial concentration of one. You use the balanced chemical equation when calculating the change (represented by x times the stoichiometric coefficient) and then solve for x to find out how much of the reactants and products are present at equilibrium.

smurphy1D
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Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby smurphy1D » Sun Jan 19, 2020 12:32 pm

If the reaction is favoring a forward reaction, in the ice box, would the reactant side of the reaction that gives a negative 'x' and the products would be gaining a 'x' value?

105335337
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby 105335337 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:57 pm

You use an ice table to calculate the concentrations of all molecules in a reaction at equilibrium. You set up the table with Initial, Change, Equilibrium going vertical and the molecules involved in the equilibrium constant going horizontally. You list the initials, the changes, and then the equilibrium is either the initial - the change or the initial + the change. You can then use these "concentrations" to calculate what x is & calculate the actual concentration of reactants.

Anokhi Patel 2B
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby Anokhi Patel 2B » Sun Jan 19, 2020 3:43 pm

The I stands for initial concentration, the C stand for change in molar concentration, and the E stands for final concentration. You put the values for each of the reactants and products in a table usually 3x3.

Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:12 pm

You have the initial, which is I, then the change in molarity, which is C, then the final equilibrium, which is E

Jocelyn Thorp 1A
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: ICE Table

Postby Jocelyn Thorp 1A » Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:15 pm

It might be super helpful to watch some videos, on youtube or khanacademy, that walk you through the ICE table; It's a bit tough to understand from just an explanation, and easier to learn by walking through one.


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