PV=nRT


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Alison Trinh 1E
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PV=nRT

Postby Alison Trinh 1E » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:40 am

When would we use this equation in relation to chemical equilibrium?

805383532
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: PV=nRT

Postby 805383532 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:02 am

It could possibly be used to find the partial pressure of a molecule if you are looking for Kp.

Jielena_Bragasin2G
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Jielena_Bragasin2G » Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:05 am

n/V is concentration, therefore this equation can also be seen as P=(concentration)RT or P/RT=(concentration). This allows us to convert from concentration to pressure or pressure to concentration in case a problem gives us some equilibrium information as pressure or some as concentration.

Manav Govil 1B
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Manav Govil 1B » Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:45 pm

We can use the equation to relate the values before and after the reaction, like comparing pressure, volume, and concentration.

Dan M -3E
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Dan M -3E » Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:53 pm

I think the most important way we can use this formula in this class is to convert between partial pressure and concentration when we need to. Other than that it is used more for physics than chemistry.

Eesha Sohail 1D
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Eesha Sohail 1D » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:43 pm

As far as I've seen, the ideal gas law is taught in high school chemistry classes more than physics classes, but that's a bit of a moot point. That said, could we possibly use other variants of the law to figure things out as well, such as P(mm) = dRT (where mm = molar mass and d = density)?

kendal mccarthy
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby kendal mccarthy » Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:34 pm

you can use this equation to gain information such as converting from concentration to pressure and vice versa.

SVajragiri_1C
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby SVajragiri_1C » Mon Jan 20, 2020 2:16 am

You can use this equation to find partial pressures of the components of the reaction (P) if you know the volume, temperature and molar concentration. Then you could find the equilibrium constant Kp by plugging in the partial pressures into the formula for Kp.

Ian Morris 3C
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Ian Morris 3C » Mon Jan 20, 2020 2:55 am

In this class, we will mainly focus on the use of PV=nRT to find concentration or pressure.

saigorijavolu2k
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Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:15 am

Re: PV=nRT

Postby saigorijavolu2k » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:57 am

If we are tested on this, we will be asked to find the pressure or even concentration and from there calculate the equilibrium constant.

Angela Wu-2H
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Angela Wu-2H » Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:40 pm

You can use the ideal gas law (PV=nRT) with concentration as well because Molarity is mol/liter, which is also what n/v is (if you divide V over to the right side).

PV=nRT --> P= (n/v)RT

ValerieChavarin 4F
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby ValerieChavarin 4F » Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:22 pm

This in relation to concentration (n/V). It's used mainly to calculate for the unknown variable.

Jasmine Vallarta 2L
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Jasmine Vallarta 2L » Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:23 pm

P = (n/V)RT = (concentration)RT

Gurmukhi Bevli 4G
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Re: PV=nRT

Postby Gurmukhi Bevli 4G » Fri Jan 24, 2020 12:11 am

It can be used to convert between partial pressure and concentration, since n/v (mol/L) is equal to concentration, for pv=nRT, n/v=P/RT.


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