Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment


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StephanieIb
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Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby StephanieIb » Thu Jan 07, 2021 8:34 pm

I chose B (it's wrong) and I don't know what the answer is. Can someone help?

For a chemical reaction that has reached equilibrium which statement is false?
A. The forward reaction rate is the same as the reverse reaction rate.
B. No matter what combination of concentrations of reactants and products we start with, the reaction will reach equilibrium.
C. There is no reaction occurring.
D. The concentrations of the reactants and products do not change.
E. None of the above

Rich Luong 1D
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Rich Luong 1D » Thu Jan 07, 2021 8:38 pm

I believe the answer would be C, because even though a reaction has undergone equilibrium, a reaction would always continue to occur, whereas what C is stating is that absolutely no reaction is occurring.

Alvin Lai 3J
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Alvin Lai 3J » Thu Jan 07, 2021 8:52 pm

C is false, because the even at equilibrium, forward and reverse reactions are still occurring.

Valerie Doan 3I
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Valerie Doan 3I » Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:34 pm

Your answer you chose (B) is wrong because any change in the initial concentration of reactants or products will eventually stabilize and reach equilibrium. A good analogy I can think of is a pendulum or swing. No matter how hard you push the swing or where (how high) you drop it, the swing will eventually slow down and reach a stable state. In this case, the swing stops moving, but in a chemical reaction the reactants and products are still reacting but their concentrations have reached a steady value. Hope this makes sense!

Jasmine Yi 1G
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Jasmine Yi 1G » Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:44 pm

Just wanted to add on and say that my ta said that reactions rarely ever "finish" or stop reacting, they just reach an equilibrium point. I thought that this made this concept make a lot more sense when I heard it.

Astha Sahoo 3I
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Astha Sahoo 3I » Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:11 pm

The correct answer would be A, because reactions never stop, but they do reach equilibrium when the concentrations of the products and reactants don't change. In order for this to happen, the forward and reverse reaction rates must be the same so there is no net change in the concentrations of reactants or products. However, the forward and reverse reactions still continue, just at equal rates. Hope this helps!

Sabine Salvucci 2E
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Sabine Salvucci 2E » Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:59 am

Hello! The answer to this question would be C because at equilibrium, although it looks like there is no reaction because the concentration of products and reactants aren't changing, the reaction is still taking place.

Vivian_Le_1L
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Vivian_Le_1L » Fri Jan 08, 2021 3:27 am

Astha Sahoo 3I wrote:The correct answer would be A, because reactions never stop, but they do reach equilibrium when the concentrations of the products and reactants don't change. In order for this to happen, the forward and reverse reaction rates must be the same so there is no net change in the concentrations of reactants or products. However, the forward and reverse reactions still continue, just at equal rates. Hope this helps!

Hi! The answer isn't A, because the question is asking which statement is false. Your description of a chemical reaction at equal equilibrium is correct, but I think you misread the question. A is true, making it the incorrect answer for this question. The answer should be C, because at equilibrium the reaction is still occurring but at the same rate for the forward and reverse reaction which you also stated in your explanation. :)

Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A » Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:54 am

The correct answer is that there is no reaction occurring (which is not true!). Whenever something is at equilibrium is means that there is no NET change of the concentrations of products and reactants but their values might slightly change due to small, almost unnoticeable perturbations. But, to be clear, the concentrations of the reactants and products stay the same overall.

Jaclyn Dang 3B
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Jaclyn Dang 3B » Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:47 am

As said above, I believe C is wrong. There is a reaction, however there is Not net reaction because the forward and reverse reaction occur at the same rate.

AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D » Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:53 am

When a reaction reaches equilibrium the rates of the forward and reverse reaction are equal but the reaction itself has not entirely stopped

Crystal Pan 2G
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Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

Postby Crystal Pan 2G » Fri Jan 08, 2021 11:53 am

The answer is C, because even during equilibrium, there are chemical reactions happening at a "molecular level." Equilibrium is achieved when the rate of the forward reaction equals the reverse reaction, therefore C is false.


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