phases caused by interactions

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505194972 3k
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

phases caused by interactions

Postby 505194972 3k » Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:01 am

How does the interaction between ions and dipoles determine the phase of something (i.e. liquid solid etc.)? Do we need to know specifically which interactions cause certain states?

Maharsh Patel 4E
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: phases caused by interactions

Postby Maharsh Patel 4E » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:15 am

It is not the interaction between ions and dipoles that determine the phase, but the size of the atom/molecule. For example, fluorine gas, F2, is a gas at room temperature, while diiodine, I2, is a solid at room temperature. F2 has 9 electrons while I2 has 53 electrons. This means that the instantaneous dipole that froms in I2 is stronger than that of F2. The induced dipole-induced dipole interaction between I2 molecules are, therefore, stronger than those of F2.

Christopher Wendland 4F
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: phases caused by interactions

Postby Christopher Wendland 4F » Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:03 am

The phase of a molecule depends on the strength of the bonds between molecules.
Last edited by Christopher Wendland 4F on Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

Leela_Mohan3L
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: phases caused by interactions

Postby Leela_Mohan3L » Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:37 am

The intermolecular forces between molecules are what determine the state of something. Generally, the stronger the intermolecular forces, the more likely something will be a solid at room temperature or have a higher boiling point.


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