dipole-dipole and dipole-induced dipole

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Ashley McClearnen 1B
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

dipole-dipole and dipole-induced dipole

Postby Ashley McClearnen 1B » Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:51 pm

Can someone please explain the difference between dipole-dipole and dipole-induced dipole interactions?

MaanasO 1A
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: dipole-dipole and dipole-induced dipole

Postby MaanasO 1A » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:11 pm

Hi Ashley!

Short answer: Dipole-dipole involves 2 polar molecules, and dipole-induced dipole involves a polar and a nonpolar molecule.

Dipole-dipole interactions take place between 2 molecules with net dipoles. These molecules don't even need to be the same. So SO2 is polar (because of its bent shape), and so is water (H2O). If SO2 and H2O interact, because they both are polar molecules (meaning they have a net dipole), their interaction will be labeled as dipole-dipole.

If a molecule with a net dipole (let's go with SO2 again) interacts with a molecule with no net dipole (say CH4), the partial charges in SO2 will have some influence on the electrons of CH4, inducing a net dipole in the CH4 molecule.

Hope that helps!

Ashley McClearnen 1B
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: dipole-dipole and dipole-induced dipole

Postby Ashley McClearnen 1B » Tue Nov 27, 2018 9:01 pm

Thank you! That was really helpful!


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