Polar v nonPolar

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duenezjuleny1D
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Polar v nonPolar

Postby duenezjuleny1D » Wed Jul 31, 2019 2:04 am

How do you identify whether or not something is polar or non polar? what does it depend on?

Ethan McCarthy 1F
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Polar v nonPolar

Postby Ethan McCarthy 1F » Wed Jul 31, 2019 7:48 am

Polarity depends on the difference between the electronegativities of two atoms connected by a covalent bond. If one of the atoms (like oxygen in H2O) has a high electronegativity, then it pulls electrons away from the atoms with a lower electronegativity (like hydrogen in this case).

Adrianh72
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Polar v nonPolar

Postby Adrianh72 » Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:58 pm

To add on to the previous reply, one needs to know an element's general electronegativity to tell whether a molecule is polar or not. The electronegativity trend is shown on the periodic table as increasing from bottom-left to top-right (with some exceptions). So if a molecule is made of atoms on opposite sides of the periodic table, it is likely polar, meaning different sides of the molecule have partial charges.

Ayushi2011
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Polar v nonPolar

Postby Ayushi2011 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 8:44 pm

You can also determine polarity from structure. If the structure of the compound is symmetric in terms of distribution of elements around the central atom, it is non polar. If the compound has a charge and is asymmetric, it is polar.

Ian Morris 3C
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Polar v nonPolar

Postby Ian Morris 3C » Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:49 pm

Adrianh72 wrote:To add on to the previous reply, one needs to know an element's general electronegativity to tell whether a molecule is polar or not. The electronegativity trend is shown on the periodic table as increasing from bottom-left to top-right (with some exceptions). So if a molecule is made of atoms on opposite sides of the periodic table, it is likely polar, meaning different sides of the molecule have partial charges.


Do you think we will need to know the exceptions for the midterm?


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