Dipole-induced dipole bond

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Areena H 2K
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:18 am

Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby Areena H 2K » Fri Nov 15, 2019 4:19 pm

When we refer to nonpolar bonds are we saying that the the electronegativity difference has to be less than 0.4 to classify it as nonpolar?

Rohit Ghosh 4F
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby Rohit Ghosh 4F » Fri Nov 15, 2019 4:30 pm

Yes, typically this is the accepted value for nonpolar interactions. However, a molecule can still be nonpolar if the difference in electronegativity is greater than 0.4 but the polarity is symmetrical. This can be seen in molecules such as carbon dioxide.

chemboi
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby chemboi » Fri Nov 15, 2019 4:31 pm

That follows the general convention of cutoffs of 0.4 and 1.7 electronegativity differences to determine if a bond is nonpolar (0-0.4), polar (0.4-1.7), or ionic (1.7+)

Areena H 2K
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby Areena H 2K » Fri Nov 15, 2019 4:39 pm

Rohit Ghosh 3C wrote:Yes, typically this is the accepted value for nonpolar interactions. However, a molecule can still be nonpolar if the difference in electronegativity is greater than 0.4 but the polarity is symmetrical. This can be seen in molecules such as carbon dioxide.


Let's say I want to name the intermolecular force between SO4 that is a nonpolar molecule but has bonds that their electronegativity difference is greater than 0.4 and we have water that has a net dipole, would we classify this as dipole-induced dipole or dipole-dipole

Arianna Perea 3H
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby Arianna Perea 3H » Fri Nov 15, 2019 6:38 pm

Why is the London Dispersion Force found in every bond?

Anika Chakrabarti 1A
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Dipole-induced dipole bond

Postby Anika Chakrabarti 1A » Fri Nov 15, 2019 6:58 pm

Arianna Perea 3H wrote:Why is the London Dispersion Force found in every bond?


London dispersion forces happen in all atoms because they all have the potential to form instantaneous dipole moments, which is when the electron density is not evenly distributed around the nucleus and is more concentrated in one area. This creates a temporary dipole, which can form a weak attraction with another temporary dipole.


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