Boiling Points

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Nick Fiorentino 1E
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Boiling Points

Postby Nick Fiorentino 1E » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:09 pm

What intermolecular forces cause higher boiling points? Lower boiling points? And what are some examples?

Sally Qiu 2E
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby Sally Qiu 2E » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:17 pm

the stronger the intermolecular force, the higher the boiling point. for example, the boiling point of water is 100 C, while the boiling point of methane (CH4) is like -260 C. water molecules are polar, which means there will be dipole-dipole forces as well as LDF (LDF are present in all molecules i believe). water also has hydrogen-bonding, the strongest of intermolecular forces. methane is nonpolar, which means it only has LDF, which are the weakest of intermolecular forces

Siddiq 1E
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Siddiq 1E » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:26 pm

All IMF's contribute to boiling points. Stronger IMF's will result in higher boiling points.

Matt F
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Matt F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:03 pm

Is this the same for melting points? So stronger IMF's also lead to higher melting points?

Maggie Eberhardt - 2H
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Maggie Eberhardt - 2H » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:06 pm

Matt F wrote:Is this the same for melting points? So stronger IMF's also lead to higher melting points?

yes I believe IMF's also lead to higher melting points

Matt F
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Matt F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:10 pm

Great, thank you

ranqiao1e
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby ranqiao1e » Fri Nov 22, 2019 10:25 pm

Stronger intermolecular force means higher boiling points

ValerieChavarin 4F
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby ValerieChavarin 4F » Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:38 pm

I'm confused between the melting point and the boiling point of a compound? Is this referring to the same thing?

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:02 pm

ValerieChavarin3E wrote:I'm confused between the melting point and the boiling point of a compound? Is this referring to the same thing?

There is a difference in which the boiling point is the temperature where a material goes from liquid to a gas and melting point is the temperature where a material changes from a solid to a liquid. When it comes to the stronger IMF, both the boiling point and melting point are higher than a compound with a weaker IMF.

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: Boiling Points

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Sat Nov 23, 2019 11:56 pm

705087773 wrote:What intermolecular forces cause higher boiling points? Lower boiling points? And what are some examples?


Something will have a higher boiling point when the IMFs are stronger, or there are more of them that makes them stronger. If something has two hydrogen bonds it will have a higher boiling point than if it had one. Also the type of IMF will have an effect on the boiling point. I think the order is something like this -- (strongest to weakest, according to textbook by Ep/(kJmol^-1): Ion-ion, hydrogen-bonds, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, dipole induced dipole, induced dipole induced dipole.


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