Boiling Points

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Lizette Noriega 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Boiling Points

Postby Lizette Noriega 1H » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:23 pm

What is the relationship between boiling points and the type of intermolecular force? Are boiling points dependent on the strength of the force? Thanks!

Aiden Metzner 2C
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby Aiden Metzner 2C » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:28 pm

Boiling points are dependent on the strength of force. The boiling point of a molecule is higher if the bonds are stronger because it takes more energy to break the bonds. So a molecule with shorter bonds will tend to have a higher boiling point.

Cassidy Kohlenberger 3D
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby Cassidy Kohlenberger 3D » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:26 pm

If a question asks which molecule has the highest boiling point, find out what type of bonding is within each molecule. The strongest are ionic bonds (ion-ion), then ion-dipoles, then hydrogen bonds, then dipole-dipoles, then LDF. The stronger the bond, the higher the boiling point.

Nick Lewis 4F
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby Nick Lewis 4F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:08 pm

Essentially, does this mean that boiling points have a direct correlation to electronegativity? I would think that if an atom is more electronegative then there is a stronger bond and thus a higher boiling point.

ashwathinair
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby ashwathinair » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:11 pm

Nick Lewis 3D wrote:Essentially, does this mean that boiling points have a direct correlation to electronegativity? I would think that if an atom is more electronegative then there is a stronger bond and thus a higher boiling point.

I would say it is more about the difference in electronegativities between atoms in a compound that the electronegativity of each atom itself. More electronegatively different atoms in a molecule makes the molecule more and more ionic (to the extent that it actually is an ionic compound), which makes it have a higher boiling point.

JasonKwon_3k
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby JasonKwon_3k » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:26 pm

It ultimately boils down (haha get it) to the strength of the bonds that are present in the compound. If bond strengths are greater, it takes more energy to weaken them thus requiring greater heat to provide that energy.

Jennifer Yang 3F
Posts: 56
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby Jennifer Yang 3F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:46 pm

If the IMF is stronger, the boiling point increases.

kristi le 2F
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Boiling Points

Postby kristi le 2F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:48 pm

Boiling points increase as the strength of the intermolecular forces increases. For example, a molecule with Hydrogen bonds will likely have a higher boiling point than a molecule with only induced dipole forces because the Hydrogen bonds require more energy to break. Higher temperatures have more energy.


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