dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

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Ayush Ray 1I
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:15 am

dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Ayush Ray 1I » Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:27 pm

What exactly is an induced dipole and what is the difference between an induced dipole and dipole-dipole?

Ami_Pant_4G
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Ami_Pant_4G » Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:35 pm

Dipole-dipole bonds depend on the polarity of molecules where as dipole-induced dipole bonds (aka van der waals forces) depend of the polarizability of electron clouds. hope this helps:)

William Francis 2E
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby William Francis 2E » Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:41 pm

Permanent dipoles exist in polar molecules. When oppositely charged dipoles attract between molecules, it is called a dipole-dipole force. Induced dipoles are temporary and present in nonpolar molecules when electrons unevenly distribute charge. These are Van Der Waal's forces.

Michelle N - 2C
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Michelle N - 2C » Thu Nov 21, 2019 8:33 pm

A dipole-dipole interaction is when two molecules with partial charges are in contact there.

Dipole-induced dipole is when there is a dipole (a molecule with a partial charge) next to an induced dipole (an atom/molecule) without a charge). If it gets close enough, the partial charge on the diple would then cause the nonpolar molecule's electrons to shift, making that once no charge molecule, a charged molecule.

Jocelyn Thorp 1A
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Jocelyn Thorp 1A » Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:00 pm

induced dipole= van der waal's forces= london forces, right?

Miriam Villarreal 1J
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Miriam Villarreal 1J » Fri Nov 22, 2019 11:02 am

dipole dipole occurs between polar molecules (partial negative and partial positive) while induced dipole attraction is a weak attraction that results when a polar molecule induces a dipole in an atom or in a nonpolar molecule by disturbing the arrangement of electrons in the nonpolar species. (therefore at any given time one end of a molecule may be more negative than the other.)

405335722
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby 405335722 » Fri Nov 22, 2019 11:30 am

Jocelyn Thorp 3K wrote:induced dipole= van der waal's forces= london forces, right?



not exactly
all bonds have some sort of van der waal's forces/london forces however, induced dipole is when the charge/polarity of a polar molecule causes a nonpolar molecule to have an instantaneous dipole.

van der waals/london forces are when two nonpolar molecules have random instantaneous and very weak dipoles

ValerieChavarin 4F
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby ValerieChavarin 4F » Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:42 pm

Dipole-dipole interactions occur in polar molecules, while an induced dipole has to do with the uneven distribution of charges, resulting form a shift in electrons.

Natalie Benitez 1E
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Natalie Benitez 1E » Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:19 pm

Why is the molecule OCS is considered polar,shouldn't their dipoles cancel out making the molecule non-polar?

Amanda Mei 1B
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Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Postby Amanda Mei 1B » Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:46 pm

Natalie Benitez 1C wrote:Why is the molecule OCS is considered polar,shouldn't their dipoles cancel out making the molecule non-polar?


Oxygen is more electronegative than sulfur, which means the C-S bond will have a stronger partial negative charge on the sulfur and the C-O bond will have a weaker partial negative charge on the O. Although the molecular is arranged symmetrically, the dipole aren't identical so they don't cancel out, resulting in the molecule being polar.


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