melting point

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NHolmes3L
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

melting point

Postby NHolmes3L » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:24 am

How do you determine high vs low melting point?

Joseph Saba
Posts: 154
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: melting point

Postby Joseph Saba » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:29 am

Determine it by the intermolecular forces of the molecules as compared with another.

Brianna Becerra 1B
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: melting point

Postby Brianna Becerra 1B » Sun Dec 08, 2019 3:52 pm

For instance, the melting points of something with an H-bond would be higher than that of London dispersion because it is stronger.

KaleenaJezycki_1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am
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Re: melting point

Postby KaleenaJezycki_1I » Sun Dec 08, 2019 3:54 pm

Joseph Saba wrote:Determine it by the intermolecular forces of the molecules as compared with another.


And the stronger the IM forces, the higher the melting and boiling points are because the forces are harder to break to switch in to different phases.

Haley Pham 4I
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: melting point

Postby Haley Pham 4I » Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:00 pm

Molecules with a higher melting point would have stronger intermolecular forces. If the molecules you are comparing have the same IMF's, you would then look at the atom size. Bigger atoms would have a higher melting point because they are more polarizable, which creates greater attractive forces, making it harder to break the IMF's and thus increasing the melting point.


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