hydrogen bonding and melting points

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Funmi Baruwa
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

hydrogen bonding and melting points

Postby Funmi Baruwa » Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:21 pm

how does hydrogen bonding lead to a higher boiling and melting point?

ellenulitsky Dis 1I
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:38 pm
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Re: hydrogen bonding and melting points

Postby ellenulitsky Dis 1I » Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:26 pm

H-bonding is a type of intermolecular force and is the strongest intermolecular force out of D-D and LDF, therefore when a molecule is present in water(ie. intermolecular forces are between two molecules), it is the hardest to break, and therefore has a higher boiling point. Hope this helps!

clairehathaway 2J
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:38 pm

Re: hydrogen bonding and melting points

Postby clairehathaway 2J » Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:35 pm

Building off of what was said above, hydrogen bonds are stronger than dipole-dipole, dipole-induced dipole, and dispersion forces so it will require more energy to break a hydrogen bond. If more energy is required to break a bond it will have a higher boiling and melting point.

Q Scarborough 1b
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm
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Re: hydrogen bonding and melting points

Postby Q Scarborough 1b » Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:59 pm

Hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular force. This means that the molecules are more tightly held together and require more energy to break the bond between them. This results in a higher boiling point.


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