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Isolated vs Isothermal

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2016 11:40 am
by Madison_Haneke_2K
I've been confused about the similarities and differences in properties of isolated systems and isothermal systems. What is the difference, and are they usually related? (ie. I think most isolated systems are also isothermal?). Additionally, how do their properties differ and therefore make our calculations and formulas differ? Thanks in advance :)

Re: Isolated vs Isothermal

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2016 1:18 pm
by Matt Villanueva 3H
Isolated systems essentially refer to a system in which no matter nor energy can flow in our out of the system (hence isolated away from everything).

Isothermal processes refers to changes in a system in which delta T does not change at all. (aka delta T=0)


If you're concerned about the characteristics of each, think of it this way:

If a system is a problem is called isolated, it cannot transfer matter/energy, heat, nor work
If a system in a problem is called isothermal, it cannot have a change in temperature, but it may be able to transfer matter/energy, heat, and work

Re: Isolated vs Isothermal

Posted: Tue Jan 26, 2016 3:10 pm
by 104422816
Cant an isolated system still expand?

Re: Isolated vs Isothermal

Posted: Tue Jan 26, 2016 5:37 pm
by Ronald Yang 2F
I don't think so because then the system would transfer energy to the surroundings in the form of work - wouldn't be isolated then.